General Information

Coronavirus (COVID-19)

The following information is from Public Health England and Gov.UK web pages. Last updated 23.9.2020

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Our Response as a Council

To read about our response as a council please click here.

If you need help during the crisis please download this flyer and see how Coventry City Council can help.

Guidance for all member of the Public

This is national guidance that applies to England only – people in ScotlandWales and Northern Ireland should follow the specific rules in those parts of the UK. If you live in an area that is experiencing a local COVID-19 outbreak and where local restrictions have been imposed, different guidance and legislation will apply. Please consult the local restrictions page to see if any restrictions are in place in your area.

1. Changes from 22 September

On 22 September, the government announced new measures to suppress the virus.

Some of these new restrictions will be set out in the law and guidance. The police and other enforcement officers are able to issue penalties to those that don’t comply with law.

Further information on these changes can be found in the relevant section below.

Detailed guidance on the new rules on how to meet people safely, including our changes to gatherings rules, can be found here.

2. Social contact

See the guidance on meeting with others safely.

2.1 Can I visit people indoors?

Yes. When meeting with people you don’t live with you can socialise in groups of up to 6. This is a legal limit. If your household (and/or support bubble) is larger than 6 people, you can gather together.

You should continue to maintain social distancing with anyone you do not live with. There is further guidance on meeting others safely, which includes details of exemptions from this limit, including for larger households and support bubbles.

2.2 How many people am I allowed to meet with outdoors?

When meeting with people you don’t live with (or who you have not formed a support bubble with) you can socialise in groups of up to 6. If your household (and/or support bubble) is larger than 6 people, this is your largest permitted group and you cannot meet as a group with any additional people.

You should continue to maintain social distancing with anyone you do not live with. There is further guidance on meeting with others safely, which includes details of exemptions from this limit, including for larger households and support bubbles.

2.3 Can I use public transport if I’m seeing friends in a park or going to my parents’ garden?

You can help control coronavirus and travel safely by walking and cycling, if you can. However where this is not possible, you can use public transport or drive. If you do use public transport, you must wear a face covering and you should follow the safer travel guidance for passengers.

2.4 Are children counted in the group of 6?

Yes.

2.5 Can I share a private vehicle with someone from another household?

You should try not to share a vehicle with those outside your household or social bubble. If you need to, try to:

  • share the transport with the same people each time
  • keep to small groups of people of up to the legal limit of 6 people at any one time
  • open windows for ventilation
  • travel side by side or behind other people, rather than facing them, where seating arrangements allow
  • face away from each other
  • consider seating arrangements to maximise distance between people in the vehicle
  • clean your car between journeys using standard cleaning products – make sure you clean door handles and other areas that people may touch
  • make sure the driver and passengers wear a face covering

The Department for Transport has provided specific guidance on using private vehicles. Please see their guidance on private cars and other vehicles for more information on car sharing and traveling with people outside your household group.

2.6 Can I stay overnight in someone else’s home?

Yes, you can stay overnight in someone else’s home, but only if you do not form a gathering of more than 6 people. You may only form a gathering of more than 6 people for an overnight stay if it is with your support bubble.

You should ensure you maintain social distancing with anyone you do not live with or who is not in your support bubble. Take particular care to maintain excellent hygiene – washing hands and surfaces – especially when using shared facilities like bathrooms wherever possible.

People in the same support bubble can stay overnight with each other in larger groups as they count as one household.

2.7 Can I look after my grandchildren?

Yes. People in groups of up to 6 can meet indoors or outdoors, which enables you to spend time with your grandchildren (although whole families may not be able to meet up at once).

We recognise that grandparents and other relatives often provide informal childcare for young children, and this can be very important. Although you should try to maintain social distance from people you do not live with wherever possible, it may not always be practicable to do so when providing care to a young child or infant. If this is this case – and where young children may struggle to keep social distance – you should still limit close contact as much as possible, and take other precautions such as washing hands and clothes regularly.

If you have formed a support bubble with your grandchildren’s household, which is allowed if either you or they live in a ‘single adult household’, then there can be close contact and social distancing is not necessary.

2.8 Is there a limit on the number of people attending funerals?

The rule of 6 does not apply to funerals. For funerals, there is a higher, legal gatherings limit of 30 people. Anyone working is not included. You should still socially distance from people you do not live with (or have formed a support bubble with). Funeral providers will limit capacity based on how many people they can safely accommodate with social distancing in place.

This limit only applies to the funeral ceremony itself – other than for religious, ceremonial purposes, wakes must only take place in groups of no more than six unless everyone present is from the same household or support bubble. Anyone who is working is not included.

The guidance on funerals can be found here.

2.9 Can weddings and civil partnership ceremonies go ahead?

Wedding and civil partnership ceremonies and receptions must only take place in COVID-19 Secure venues or in public outdoor spaces. From 28 September, weddings, civil partnership ceremonies and wedding receptions are restricted to 15 people. Receptions must be sit down meals. Anyone working is not counted as part of the limit.

Within these larger gatherings, people do not need to limit their interaction to groups of 6, but social distancing should still be followed between people not in the same household or support bubble.

See further guidance on wedding ceremonies and civil partnerships.

2.10 When can I gather in groups of more than 6?

If you live in a household with more than 6 people, you can continue to gather in and attend all settings together. This same applies for your support bubble. All venues should continue to accommodate groups larger than 6 who live together or are in the same support bubble.

There are exceptions where groups can be larger than 6 people, including:

  • for work, or the provision of voluntary or charitable services
  • registered childcare, education or training
  • supervised activities provided for children, including wraparound care, youth groups and activities, and children’s playgroups
  • providing support to a vulnerable person
  • providing emergency assistance, and to avoid injury or illness or to escape risk of harm
  • for arrangements where children do not live in the same household as both their parents
  • fulfilling a legal obligation such as attending court or jury service
  • weddings and civil partnership ceremonies and receptions – from 28 September, up to 15 people, in a public place
  • funerals – up to 30 people. From 28 September, this does not include wakes (which are subject to the rule of 6), other than for religious ceremonial purposes
  • organised outdoor sport or licensed outdoor physical activity, and supervised sporting activity (indoors or outdoors) for under-18s. Organised indoor sport or exercise classes can take place in larger numbers, provided groups of more than 6 do not mix. Organised indoor team sports for disabled people can take place in any number.
  • elite sporting competition and training
  • support groups up to 15 – formally organised groups to provide mutual aid, therapy or any other form of support. This includes support to victims of crime, recovering addicts, new parents, people with long-term illnesses, those facing issues relating to their sexuality or gender, and those who have suffered bereavement.
  • protests – if organised in compliance with COVID-19 Secure guidance. All individuals must be socially distanced.

Where a group includes someone covered by one of these exemptions, they are not counted as part of the gatherings limit. This means, for example, that a tradesperson can go into a household of six without breaching the limit if they are there for work.

2.11 Does this mean that no more than six people can be in a pub, restaurant or place of worship at once?

Venues following COVID-19 Secure guidelines can host more than 6 people in total, but no one should visit in a group of greater than 6 (unless you are all from the same household or support bubble). When you visit one of these places, such as a pub, shop, leisure venue, restaurant or place of worship you should:

  • follow the limits on the number of other people you should meet with as a group (it will be illegal to be in a group of more than six from outside of your household or support bubble). If your household and/or support bubble is larger than 6 people, this is your largest permitted group and you cannot meet as a group with any additional people.
  • avoid mingling with anyone outside the group you are with, even if you see other people you know
  • provide your contact details to the organiser so that you can be contacted if needed by the NHS Test and Trace programme
  • wear a face covering (except for when eating and drinking)

2.12 Can I have a celebration for significant or ceremonial life events, other than weddings?

As of 28 September, the rule of six will apply to standalone religious and belief-based life cycle ceremonies, such as stone setting ceremonies or wakes. This means that these events must be limited to 6 attendees.

Events like christenings and bar/bat mitzvahs can take place as part of a larger gathering within communal worship provided that groups of more than 6 do not mingle.

2.13 Do I have to socially distance from my partner / boyfriend / girlfriend?

People in an established relationship do not need to socially distance. If in the early stages of a relationship, you should take particular care to follow the guidance on social distancing. If you intend to have close contact with someone, you should discuss how you can help to prevent risks of transmission as a couple, for example, by ensuring you are both avoiding close contact with people you do not live with.

2.14 How will the new rules on gatherings be enforced?

The police will be able to enforce these legal limits, and if you break them you could face a fine (fixed penalty notice) of £200, doubling for further breaches up to a maximum of £6,400.

Hospitality businesses are also required to ensure there are no unlawful gatherings in their premises. We know the majority of businesses are responsible and are taking the necessary steps to be COVID-19 Secure, but for those businesses who won’t take those steps, egregious breaches will be enforced. Any breaches are liable of a fine of up to £10,000. We will be extending these legal requirements to extra businesses in the leisure and entertainment sectors from 28 September.

Anyone holding a gathering of more than 30 (such as a rave or house party) could face a £10,000 fine.

2.15 Can I gather in a group of more than 6 for childcare?

There is an exemption to the legal gatherings limit for the purposes of education, training, formal registered childcare, and supervised activities for children (including before and after school clubs, or other out-of-school setting provision for children.

Youth groups and other children’s groups are also exempt from the gatherings limit. Family and friends can continue to provide informal childcare as long as groups from different households don’t exceed 6 people and the activity is strictly limited to childcare needs.

3. Visiting public places and taking part in activities

3.1 Are there restrictions on how far I can travel?

No. You can travel irrespective of distance, but you should take hygiene and safety precautions if using services on the way.

You can use public transport but it is better to travel in other ways if possible. It is difficult to socially distance during car journeys and transmission of coronavirus can occur in this context. So avoid travelling with someone from outside your household or your support bubble unless you can practise social distancing.

Further guidance on car sharing is available. If you need to use public transport, you should follow the safer travel guidance for passengers. When travelling on public transport you are legally required to wear a face covering.

If visiting other parts of the UK – Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland – you must adhere to the laws and guidance of the devolved administrations at all times. If you wish to travel internationally, you should follow the laws of other countries and FCDO international travel advice. Upon return to the UK, you must by law self-isolate for 14 days, unless you have come from one of the countries listed here, and you are required to complete a passenger locator form before arriving in the UK. This is crucial to help to ensure the virus does not spread across borders.

3.2 Are day trips ok?

Yes, day trips to outdoor open space are allowed. You should take hygiene and safety precautions if using services on the way. You should practise social distancing from other people outside your household or support bubble. You should walk or cycle if you can, however where this is not possible, you can use public transport or drive. If you do use public transport, you must wear a face covering and should follow the safer travel guidance for passengers.

3.3 Can I go on holiday? Can I stay in my second home?

Yes.

However, you should not go on holiday in England with people you do not live with (or who are not in your support bubble) in a group larger than 6 people. Doing so is against the law. You should ensure you maintain social distancing with anyone you do not live with or is not in your support bubble.

If you are in a support bubble, or if the group consists solely of people you live with, you can stay overnight without needing to maintain social distancing. People in the same support bubble can also gather together indoors even if the group size is more than 6.

Take particular care to maintain excellent hygiene – washing hands and surfaces – and avoid using shared facilities like bathrooms wherever possible.

3.4 What happens if I become unwell while on holiday in England?

If you develop symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) while staying in overnight accommodation you should inform the accommodation provider immediately, self-isolate where you are to minimise any risk of transmission, and request a test by calling 119 or online at nhs.uk. If your test is positive you should return home as quickly and directly as possible. You should use private transport but only drive yourself if you are well enough to do so safely and can avoid contact with others on your journey home.

Avoid using public transport in order to reduce the spread of the virus. If you cannot avoid using public transport, you should continue to self-isolate in your accommodation and call 111 for further advice.

In most cases, it will not be possible to self-isolate at your holiday accommodation. In these cases, you should make arrangements to travel home as safely as possible, while minimising the risk of infecting others.

It may be possible for you to agree with the accommodation provider to extend your stay in order to self-isolate until you are well enough to travel. Unless otherwise provided for in the contractual terms of the booking, you will be expected to pay the costs of an extended stay in all but exceptional circumstances.

Once home, you should continue to follow the government guidance on self-isolationhousehold isolation and social distancing.

3.5 What if I can’t travel home?

If you feel so unwell that you cannot travel, or if you cannot avoid using public transport, (for example because you do not have the means to travel via private transport), you should call 111 and ask to discuss your circumstances with an appropriate health care professional.

3.6 What happens if I am on holiday in England and I am contacted by NHS Test and Trace?

If NHS Test and Trace contacts you while you are on holiday to tell you that you have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for coronavirus, you should tell your accommodation provider immediately and make arrangements to return home as quickly and directly as you can.

You should self-isolate for 14 days from the last day you had contact with the person who tested positive, even if you remain well. If you cannot avoid using public transport to get home, you should continue to self-isolate where you are staying and call 111 for advice.

If it is agreed with the accommodation provider that you can extend your stay in order to self-isolate until you are able to make safe travel arrangements, unless otherwise provided for in the contractual terms of the booking, you will be expected to pay the costs of an extended stay in all but exceptional circumstances.

In many cases it will not be possible to self-isolate at your holiday accommodation. In these cases, you should make arrangements to travel home as safely as possible, while minimising the risk to others. If this isn’t possible because you feel so unwell that you cannot travel, or if you cannot avoid using public transport, you should call 111 for advice.

If you start to feel unwell during your self-isolation period, get a test either online at www.nhs.uk/coronavirus or by calling 119.

People you have been travelling with, or people you live with, do not need to self-isolate if you do not have symptoms, unless contacted and asked to self-isolate by NHS Test and Trace.

3.7 Do I need to follow the rules if I’m on holiday in another country?

If you are abroad, you should follow the rules of the country you are in. You should also follow the same principles to keep you and your loved ones safe. It is essential to maintain social distancing wherever possible from those you don’t live with and wash your hands regularly. These rules are important wherever you are in the world.

3.8 Can I visit outdoor tourist sites? What about indoor ones?

Yes, you can still travel to outdoor areas, such as National Parks or beaches. It is advisable to check ahead to ensure the venue is open to visitors. You are also able to visit most indoor sites and attractions.

When going with people you don’t live with you should only attend in groups of up to 6 people. This does not apply if your household (and/or support bubble) is larger than 6 people, in which case the largest permitted group is your household or bubble. Exemptions apply, for example for school groups.

3.9 Can I pray in a place of worship?

Yes, places of worship will stay open for services and communal prayer in line with guidance for reopening Places of Worship.

Places of worship can stay open for services for more than 6 people. However, you must not mingle in a group of more than 6 people (other than with people you live with or have formed a support bubble with), in which case the largest permitted group is your household or bubble.

Strict adherence to social distancing is strongly advised and a distance of 2 metres (or 1 metre with additional COVID-19 Secure measures in place) should be kept from people you do not live with wherever possible.

3.10 Can I send my teenagers to their youth club?

Yes, you can. However, you should advise your children to maintain social distancing, wash their hands regularly and limit social interaction outside of these formal activities with anyone they do not live with.

The club should also follow COVID-19 Secure guidance.

3.11 Can I go to a pub or restaurant with people I don’t live with?

When eating or drinking out with people you do not live with (and who are not in your support bubble), you must keep to the wider rules on group sizes: you must only attend these places in groups of up to 6 people. You can attend in larger numbers with the people you live with or who are in your support bubble – in this case the maximum size of the group will be just those you live with or your support bubble.

If you visit pubs, restaurants and other venues in the hospitality sector you must provide your contact information, or check in using the official NHS QR code before being allowed entry to the venue.

In all cases, people from different households should ensure they socially distance as much as possible. You should think about where to sit at a table with this in mind – the premises should also take reasonable steps to help you do so in line with COVID-19 Secure guidelines. It remains the case that you do not need to maintain social distancing with those in your support bubble. This change also does not affect the support you receive from your carers.

From 24 September it is mandatory to wear a face covering in a pub or restaurant, except for when eating or drinking.

3.12 Can I register the birth of my child?

You are permitted to register the birth of your child. You should check whether your local register office is open. The office will also be able to advise you on appointment availability.

3.13 Can I go to the theatre or a concert?

You can now attend indoor and outdoor performances, for example dramatic, musical or comedy shows.

If you are watching the performance, you should:

  • only attend in a group of no larger than 6, unless attending with those you live with or your support bubble
  • socially distance from people you do not live with (or who are not in your support bubble)

3.14 When will I be able to go to a football match?

Due to rising prevalence levels, it is not safe to allow fans to return to stadia. We will continue to monitor the virus, and return crowds to stadia when it is safe to do so.

3.15 Can I still participate in sport and physical activity in groups of more than 6?

Adults can continue to take part in outdoor organised sport and licensed physical outdoor activity in groups of more than six, provided it is organised by a national governing body, club, registered instructor/coach, business or charity; and/or involve someone who has received an official license to use equipment relevant to the activity. In all cases, the organiser must conduct a risk assessment and ensure compliance with COVID-19 Secure guidance.

You should only be playing outdoor team sports and partaking in outdoor physical activity where the relevant governing body has published guidance on how to do so safely, and you can play outdoors. See a list of team sports governing bodies which have developed guidance. Other outdoor sports or licensed outdoor physical activities may also be permitted if this is formally organised by a sports club or similar organisation and following sports-governing body guidance.

For adults, outdoor organised exercise classes can still take place in groups larger than six. When participating in any exempted activity like this, you must not mingle in groups of more than 6 before and after the activity. You should always ensure you socially distance from people you do not live with (or have formed a support bubble with) wherever possible.

From 24 September, organised indoor sport and indoor exercise classes can continue to take place with larger numbers present, provided groups of more than six do not mix. If groups of six are likely to mix, these indoor activities must not go ahead. There is an exemption or organised indoor team sports for disabled people.

The relevant indoor sport facilities guidance or outdoor guidance must be followed for these activities. Organised Sport and Physical Activity events are allowed provided they follow guidance for the public on the phased return of outdoor sport and recreation in England. All supervised activities for under 18s, including sports and exercise groups, indoors and out, are permitted where a risk assessment has been carried out. This should follow guidance on out of school settings.

Other forms of exercise must only take place in groups of six unless everyone is from the same household or support bubble.

When playing sports informally (where not organised in line with the rules above) with people you don’t live with, you must limit the size of your group to 6. It is illegal to do so in a larger group and you may be fined.

3.16 Do I have to wear a face covering in public?

You are required to wear a face covering in the following settings:

  • on public transport
  • indoor transport hubs
  • taxis and private hire vehicles (PHVs) (from 23 September)
  • shops and supermarkets
  • hospitality venues, such as pubs and restaurants, except when eating or drinking (from 24 September)
  • indoor shopping centres
  • banks and building societies
  • post offices
  • museums
  • galleries
  • cinemas and theatres
  • places of worship
  • public libraries

People are also strongly encouraged to wear face coverings in any other enclosed public spaces where there are people they do not normally meet.

From 23 September, you will need to wear face coverings in taxis and private hire vehicles. You will also need to wear face coverings in hospitality venues, when you are not eating or drinking. From 24 September, in retail and hospitality settings, staff will be required to wear face covering as well. Please check sector specific guidance to see if this requirement applies to your workplace.

You do not need to wear a face covering if you have a legitimate reason not to. This includes (but is not limited to):

  • children under 11
  • because of a physical or mental illness or impairment, or disability
  • to communicate with someone who relies on lip reading
  • to avoid harm or injury; to identify yourself
  • to eat or drink if necessary

You can carry something that says you do not have to wear a face covering for medical reasons. This is a personal choice, and is not necessary in law – you should not routinely be required to produce any written evidence to justify the fact you are not wearing a face covering.

Relevant guidance on face coverings is available here

3.17 Can I go to my support group?

Some types of support group are exempt from the legal gatherings limit of 6. A maximum number of 15 people can attend such groups.

Support groups can take place in groups of up to 15 in a public place, if the support group is organised by a business, a charitable, benevolent or philanthropic institution or a public body to provide mutual aid, therapy or any other form of support to its members or those who attend its meetings. This includes, but is not limited to, providing support:

  • to victims of crime (including domestic abuse)
  • to those with, or recovering from, addictions (including alcohol, narcotics or other substance addictions) or addictive patterns of behaviour
  • to new and expectant parents
  • to those with, or caring for persons with, any long-term illness, disability or terminal condition or who are vulnerable
  • to those facing issues related to their sexuality or identity including those living as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender
  • to those who have suffered bereavement

This is an exemption to the legal gatherings limit of 6 people.

Support groups not covered by this exemption can still take place if they do not breach the new gatherings limit of six people. This means that for these other groups, in a COVID-19 Secure venue or public outdoor place, there can be more than 6 people in total present, but social interaction and shared activity must be limited to groups of 6. Where this is unlikely to be possible, no more than 6 people should attend. Anybody who is working in facilitating the group or attending for work purposes is not included.

3.18 Can I go to my hobby club / amateur musical group / other leisure activity?

It is against the law to gather in groups of more than 6, where people are from different households or support bubbles. Some activities – such as those organised for under-18s – are exempt. In a COVID-19 Secure venue or public outdoor place, non-professional performing arts activity, including choirs, orchestras or drama groups can continue to rehearse or perform together where this is planned activity in line with the performing arts guidance and if they can do so in a way that ensures that there is no interaction between groups of more than 6 at any time.

If an amateur group is not able to ensure that no mingling takes place between these sub-groups of no more than 6 (including when arriving at or leaving activity or in any breaks or socialising) then such non-professional activity should not take place.

4. Clinically vulnerable groups and clinically extremely vulnerable groups, and care homes

If you have any of the health conditions listed in the clinically vulnerable guidance or are over 70 you could be at higher risk of severe illness from coronavirus.

Specific advice can be found in the clinically vulnerable guidance.

4.1 What is the current guidance for people identified as clinically extremely vulnerable who were previously advised to shield?

Formal shielding advice is currently paused nationally – check any local variations.

This means:

  • you can continue to go to work as long as the workplace is COVID-19 Secure but should carry on working from home wherever possible
  • clinically extremely vulnerable children should attend education settings in line with the wider guidance on reopening of schools and guidance for full opening: special schools and other specialist settings
  • you can go outside as much as you like but you should still try to keep your overall social interactions low and keep to the new gathering limit of 6
  • you can visit businesses, such as supermarkets, pubs and shops, whilst keeping 2 metres away from others wherever possible or 1 metre plus other precautions
  • you should continue to pay particular attention to washing your hands carefully and more frequently than usual and maintaining thorough cleaning of frequently touched areas in your home and/or workspace

For practical tips on staying safe see the meeting with others safely guidance.

Those who were previously identified to be on the Shielding patient list and need extra help may still be able to get:

  • local volunteer support by contacting your local authority
  • prescriptions, essential items and food you buy delivered by NHS Volunteer Responders
  • priority slots for supermarket deliveries (if you previously registered for free food parcels).

Further information can be found in the clinically extremely vulnerable guidance.

4.2 What safety standards have been put in place in care homes?

We have published a winter plan for adult social care. The plan sets out the actions the government will be taking at the national level; and the actions that every local area and care provider needs to take to prevent and manage COVID-19 in care homes.

Detailed guidance on isolation procedures, PPE and infection control, cleaning and how to provide personal care safely has been published. As with all of our advice, this guidance is kept under constant review and updated frequently, in line with the latest scientific evidence.

4.3 Can I still visit a family member who lives in a care home?

Preventing infection is our priority and so any area that is designated as ‘an area of intervention’ will immediately have visits restricted.

We have introduced tightened measures which will enable residents and their loved ones to have safe visits for low prevalence areas, such as supervision by staff to ensure they are COVID-19 Secure.

More information on visiting arrangements in care homes

5. Going to work and being COVID-19 Secure

5.1 Who is allowed to go to work?

With the exception of the organisations listed in this guidance on closing businesses and venues, the government has not required any other businesses to close to the public – it is important for business to carry on.

To help contain the virus, office workers who can work effectively from home should do so over the winter. Where an employer, in consultation with their employee, judges an employee can carry out their normal duties from home they should do so. Public sector employees working in essential services, including education settings, should continue to go into work where necessary. Anyone else who cannot work from home should go to their place of work. The risk of transmission can be substantially reduced if COVID-19 Secure guidelines are followed closely. Extra consideration should be given to those people at higher risk.

If you are clinically extremely vulnerable, you can go to work as long as the workplace is Covid-19 Secure but should carry on working from home wherever possible.

Anyone with symptoms of coronavirus should not attend work. They should immediately self isolate at home and get a test. Their household members should self isolate too. There is specific guidance for those showing symptoms.

5.2 What are the ‘COVID-19 Secure’ safety guidelines workplaces have to put in place?

We have set out clear, practical steps that businesses should take to ensure they are COVID-19 Secure and customers are confident to visit.

From 24 September it will become law for certain businesses to put in place key COVID-19 Secure measures:

  • food and drink venues (except take-aways) must provide table service to prevent customers queuing to order, and customers must be seated when consuming food and drink inside the premises
  • the following venues will have restricted opening hours, requiring closure to the public between 10pm and 5am: businesses selling food or drinks (including cafes, bars, pubs and restaurants), social clubs, casinos, bowling alleys, amusement arcades (and other indoor leisure centres of facilities), fun fairs, theme parks, adventure parks, and bingo halls. Businesses and venues selling food for consumption off the premises, can continue to do so as long as this is through delivery service or drive-thru.
  • cinemas, theatres and concert halls can stay open after 10pm, only if the performance started before 10pm. They should not serve food or drink after this time.

From 28 September further measures will become law:

  • a wider range of leisure and entertainment venues, services provided in community centres and close contact settings will be subject to COVID19 Secure requirements in law. This includes ensuring customers observe the rule of six, and appropriate social distancing through signage, layout, and managing customer entry.
  • businesses must remind customers to wear face coverings where mandated.

Employers will be banned from requiring self-isolating employees from coming to work.

5.3 Can work gatherings exceed 6 people?

Work gatherings are exempt from the gatherings limit of 6. Where a group includes someone who is working, they are not counted as part of the gatherings limit. This means a tradesperson can go into a household of six without breaching the limit, if they are there for work.

5.4 Do I need to stay 2 metres apart – or 1 metre?

People should either stay 2 metres apart wherever possible or ‘1 metre plus’ where this is not – which is one metre plus mitigations that will help to prevent transmission. These mitigations will depend on the workplace or setting. For example, on public transport, shops, supermarkets and in other public places, people must wear a face covering, as it is not always possible to stay 2 metres apart. People should also wash or sanitise their hands regularly and avoid the busiest routes and times (like the rush hour).

In other spaces, mitigations could include installing screens, making sure people face away from each other, and interventions such as providing handwashing facilities, minimising the amount of time you spend with people outside your household or bubble, and being outdoors.

We have set out COVID-19 Secure guidance to help businesses take the measures that are right for them.

5.5 How will health and safety regulations be enforced?

Where the enforcing authority, such as the Health and Safety Executive or your local authority, identifies employers who are not taking action to comply with the relevant public health legislation and guidance to control public health risks (for example, not completing a new risk assessment taking account the risk of COVID-19, or taking insufficient measures in response), they will consider a range of actions to improve control of workplace risks. This includes giving specific advice to a business, or issuing an improvement notice, which a business must respond to in a fixed time, or a prohibition notice. Failure to comply is a criminal offence, which can lead to fines or imprisonment for up to two years, giving the COVID-19 Secure guidelines indirect legal enforceability.

Local authorities also have powers to place restrictions upon or close any premises if they believe it necessary to help prevent transmission of COVID-19.

Hospitality businesses are required to ensure there are no unlawful gatherings in their premises. We know the majority of businesses are responsible and are taking the necessary steps to be COVID-19 Secure, but for those businesses who won’t take those steps, we are introducing fines of up to £10,000. Local authorities also have powers to close those businesses that are putting the public at risk.

Government has announced an initial £60 million to support additional enforcement activity by local authorities and the police, in addition to funding that has already been awarded.

6. Workers’ rights

6.1 My employer is asking me to come to work but I’m scared.

To help contain the virus, office workers who can work effectively from home should do so over the winter. Where an employer, in consultation with their employee, judges an employee can carry out their normal duties from home they should do so. Public sector employees working in essential services, including education settings, should continue to go into work where necessary. Anyone else who cannot work from home should go to their place of work. The risk of transmission can be substantially reduced if COVID-19 Secure guidelines are followed closely. Extra consideration should be given to those people at higher risk.

If you remain concerned that your employer is not taking all practical steps to promote social distancing then you can report this to your local authority or the Health and Safety Executive who can take a range of action, including where appropriate requiring your employer to take additional steps.

6.2 What if they try to fire me because I won’t go to work but cannot work at home?

We urge employers to take socially responsible decisions and listen to the concerns of their staff. Employers and employees should come to a pragmatic agreement about their working arrangements.

If individuals need advice, they should approach ACAS where they can get impartial advice about work disputes.

7. Public Transport

7.1 Who is allowed to travel on public transport?

You should walk or cycle if you can. However where this is not possible, you can use public transport or drive. If you are using public transport, you should follow the safer travel guidance for passengers.

7.2 Should people wear face coverings on public transport?

It is the law that you must wear a face covering when travelling in England on a:

  • bus or coach
  • train or tram
  • ferry or hovercraft or other vessel
  • aircraft
  • cable car
  • in an enclosed transport hub, such as a train or bus station

If you do not wear a face covering you will be breaking the law and could be fined £200, or £100 if you pay the fine within 14 days. As announced, we will bring forward changes to mean that for repeat offenders these fines would double at each offence up to a maximum value of £6,400.

Please be aware that some people are exempt, and do not have to wear a face covering on public transport, including for health, age or equality reasons.

We have published guidance for those making face coverings at home, to help illustrate the process.

A face covering is not the same as the surgical masks or respirators used as part of personal protective equipment by healthcare and other workers; these should continue to be reserved for those who need them to protect against risks in their workplace such as health and care workers and those in industrial settings like those exposed to dust hazards.

7.3 Will a face covering stop me getting COVID-19?

The evidence suggests that face coverings can help us protect each other and reduce the spread of the disease from someone who is suffering from coronavirus, but not showing symptoms. That is why it is important to wear a face covering on public transport and it is required by law. It is currently mandatory to wear face coverings in shops, supermarkets, indoor shopping centres, banks, building societies, post offices, indoor transport hubs, museums, galleries, cinemas, places of worship, and public libraries. Relevant guidance on face coverings is available here.

To protect yourself, you should also continue to follow guidance on meeting safely with others and wash your hands regularly.

8. Schools and Childcare

8.1 Education and childcare

The government is committed to doing everything possible to allow all children to attend school safely, to support their wellbeing and education and help working parents. The overwhelming majority of children have now returned to school.

You can find out more about the government’s approach to education and how schools are preparing.

8.2 How will you make sure it is safe?

Keeping children and staff safe is our utmost priority. As more children return to school, we require new safety standards to set out how schools and early years settings can be adapted to operate safely.

We have published guidance advising schools and early years on reopening to ensure schools can adequately prepare new safety measures to operate safely and minimise the spread of the virus.

Protective measures to reduce transmission include regular hand cleaning, hygiene and cleaning measures, and small consistent groups. We have asked schools to consider staggering drop-off and arrival times, break times, and make use of outdoor space.

We have also published guidance on face coverings in education institutions that teach people in Years 7 and above. Schools and colleges have the discretion to require face coverings in communal areas where social distancing cannot be safely managed, if they believe that it is right in their particular circumstances. In areas where local restrictions apply, face coverings should be worn by adults and pupils (Years 7 and above) when moving around, such as in corridors and communal areas where social distancing is difficult to maintain.

Groups can be larger than 6 people for registered childcare, education and training purposes.

8.3 Can I go back to University?

Yes, Universities are preparing to welcome students back safely. Our guidance has advised safety measures, including good ventilation, using a blend of online and face to face provision, the use of face coverings in communal areas where distancing is not possible and good hand hygiene.

We have published guidance advising universities on reopening to ensure they can adequately prepare new safety measures to operate safely and minimise the spread of the virus. As with other essential services, employees working in education and higher education should continue to go into work where necessary.

Students will be expected to follow the latest guidance on social contact in their local area whilst attending university, and should not leave their university accommodation to go home in the event of an outbreak or restrictions being imposed on a local area.

8.4 Who is in my household if I am in university halls?

Your accommodation provider will identify your household in halls within which routine contact can be easily managed. A household in halls is normally considered to be those students living in the same flat or on the same floor who share a kitchen and/or bathroom rather than an entire block. You must not gather in groups of more than 6 with people who are not in your household.

9. Borders / international visitors

9.1 What are the rules for quarantining if you’ve been abroad?

Unless you have only been in a country or territory on the UK’s travel corridor list in the last 14 days, when you arrive in the UK you must travel directly to the place you are staying and not leave the place where you’re staying until 14 full days have passed since you were last in a country or territory not on that list. Exemptions are in place for some countries where the risk of transmission is low. Find out more about self-isolation when you travel to the UK. You must also complete a public health passenger locator form to provide details of your journey.

You may be fined up to £100 for failure to fill out the passenger locator form ahead of your arrival into the country, or more if you break this rule more than once. You also may not be allowed to enter the UK (unless you’re either British or a UK resident).

In England, if you are required to self-isolate and if you do not, you can be fined £1,000. If you do not provide an accurate contact detail declaration – or do not update your contact detail form in the limited circumstances where you need to move to another place to self-isolate – you can be fined. These fines start at £100 and will double – up to £3,200 – for repeated offences.

9.2 How do the quarantine exemptions work?

Passengers arriving from the countries and territories on the UK’s travel corridor listwill not be required to self-isolate on arrival into the UK, unless you have visited or stopped in a country or territory not on that list in the preceding 14 days, when you must self-isolate at the address you provided on the public health passenger locator form.

We will keep the conditions in these countries and territories under review. If they worsen we will not hesitate to reintroduce self-isolation requirements.

Travellers should always check the latest FCO travel advice. Travel advice includes information on any health measures in place for visitors to the country or territory. These can include a requirement to self-isolate, quarantine, or undergo testing for COVID-19, or even restrictions on entry.

Information on self-isolation in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland can be found on the Devolved Administration websites:

9.3 What rules do I need to follow if I am visiting the UK?

Before you travel to the UK from anywhere outside the Common Travel Area, you should complete the public health Passenger Locator Form, providing your journey and contact details, as well as the address where you will self-isolate.

If you are required to self-isolate, when you arrive in the UK you must travel directly to the place you are staying and not leave the place where you’re staying until 14 full days have passed since you were last in a non-exempt country or territory. The 14-day period starts from the day after you leave a non-exempt country or territory. A non-exempt country or territory is any country or territory that is not on the travel corridors list.

If you do not have any coronavirus symptoms at the end of your self-isolation period, you can stop self-isolating. You will then need to follow the same rules as people who live in the UK. People should follow the government guidelines, including maintaining social distancing with those they are not staying with and washing their hands regularly. If you develop symptoms at any time you should get a test and restart your period of isolation.

Advice for if you have COVID-19 Symptoms 

Symptoms

The most important symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) are recent onset of any of the following:

  • a new continuous cough
  • a high temperature
  • a loss of, or change in, your normal sense of taste or smell (anosmia)

For most people, COVID-19 will be a mild illness. However, if you have any of the symptoms above, stay at home and arrange to have a test to see if you have COVID-19 – go to testing to arrange.

Main messages

If you have symptoms of COVID-19 however mild, self-isolate for at least 10 days from when your symptoms started. You should arrange to have a test to see if you have COVID-19 – go to testing to arrange. Do not go to a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital.

If you are not experiencing symptoms but have tested positive for COVID-19, self-isolate for at least 10 days, starting from the day the test was taken. If you develop symptoms during this isolation period, restart your 10-day isolation from the day you developed symptoms.

From 28 September, you could be fined if you do not stay at home and self-isolate following a positive test result for COVID-19 or if you are contacted by NHS Test and Trace and instructed to self-isolate.

After 10 days, if you still have a temperature you should continue to self-isolate and seek medical advice. You do not need to self-isolate after 10 days if you only have a cough or loss of sense of smell or taste, as these symptoms can last for several weeks after the infection has gone. See the ending isolation section below for more information.

If you live with others, all other household members need to stay at home and not leave the house for 14 days. The 14-day period starts from the day when the first person in the household became ill or if they do not have symptoms, from the day their test was taken. If anyone else in the household starts displaying symptoms, they need to stay at home for at least 10 days from when their symptoms appear, regardless of what day they are on in their original 14-day isolation period. The ending isolation section below has more information.

If you have symptoms, try and stay as far away from other members of your household as possible. It is especially important to stay away from anyone who is clinically vulnerable or clinically extremely vulnerable with whom you share a household.

Reduce the spread of infection in your home by washing your hands regularly for 20 seconds using soap and water, or use hand sanitiser, and cover coughs and sneezes.

Consider alerting people who you do not live with and have had close contact within the last 48 hours to let them know you have symptoms of COVID-19.

Following a positive test result, you will receive a request by text, email or phone to log into the NHS Test and Trace service website and provide information about recent close contacts.

If you feel you cannot cope with your symptoms at home, or your condition gets worse, then use the NHS 111 online COVID-19 service. If you do not have internet access, call NHS 111. For a medical emergency dial 999.

If you develop COVID-19 symptoms again at any point after ending your first period of isolation (self or household), follow the guidance on self-isolation again. The section below has further information.

Who is this guidance for?

This guidance is intended for:

  • people who have received a positive test result of COVID-19
  • people with symptoms of COVID-19 who are waiting for a test result, or who have not been tested and do not require hospital treatment
  • people living in households with someone who shows symptoms of or who has received a positive test result for COVID-19

Will my household be tested if we think we have COVID-19 symptoms?

Anyone with symptoms of COVID-19 needs to immediately self-isolate and arrange to have a test to see if they have COVID-19 – go to testing to arrange.

If you develop symptoms you may wish to alert the people who you do not live with and that you have had close contact with over the last 48 hours to let them know that you might have COVID-19 but are waiting for a test result. At this stage, those people should not self-isolate. Alerting those that you have been in contact with means they can take extra care in practising social distancing and good hand and respiratory hygiene. They can also be more alert to any symptoms they might develop.

People who have tested positive will receive a text, email or phone call requesting that they log into the NHS Test and Trace website to create a confidential account where they can record details about their recent close contacts. If you do not have access to the internet, then you will be phoned by a contact tracer working for the NHS Test and Trace service. The information you provide will be handled in strict confidence and will enable the NHS Test and Trace service to contact those people and provide them with advice on whether they should go into self-isolation. The people contacted will not be told your identity, but by alerting them when you first develop symptoms, you can help make sure that they are prepared for being contacted by the Test and Trace service.

Why staying at home is very important

It is very important that people with symptoms of or a positive COVID-19 test and their household members stay at home. Staying at home will help prevent the spread of the virus to family, friends, the wider community, and particularly those who are clinically extremely vulnerable.

If you have symptoms of COVID-19 or a positive test, remain at home for at least 10 days after the onset of your symptoms (see ending self-isolation below). This will reduce the risk of you infecting others.

If you have symptoms of COVID-19 or a positive test, then you should avoid contact with other household members as much as possible.

Other members of your household, including those who do not have any symptoms, need to stay at home and not leave the house for 14 days. Do not go out even to buy food or other essentials, and any exercise should be taken within your home. This 14-day period starts from the day when the first person in your house became ill or if they do not have symptoms, from the day their test was taken. There is more information in the ending self-isolation section below.

Staying at home for 14 days will greatly reduce the overall amount of infection the household could pass on to others in the community.

While you are self-isolating, make sure you do the following things

Stay at home

You and everyone else in your household needs to remain at home. Do not go to work, school, or public areas, and do not use public transport or taxis.

Nobody should go out even to buy food or other essentials, and any exercise should be taken within your home.

If you require help with buying groceries, other shopping or picking up medication, or walking a dog, you should ask friends or family. Alternatively, you can order your shopping online and medication by phone or online. Delivery drivers should not come into your home, so make sure you ask them to leave items outside for collection.

Further guidance on accessing food and essential supplies is available at Accessing food and essential supplies.

If you are unable to work due to COVID-19, please refer to this guidance from the Department for Work and Pensions to find out about the support that is available to you.

Living with children

Not all these measures will be possible if you are living with children but keep following this guidance to the best of your ability.

Children with COVID-19 appear to be less severely affected. It is nevertheless important to do your best to ensure that all members of your household follow this guidance.

For those with learning disabilities, autism or serious mental illness

Not all these measures will be possible if you, or those you are living with, have significant conditions such as learning disabilities, autism or serious mental illness. Please keep following this guidance to the best of your ability, whilst keeping yourself and those close to you safe and well, ideally in line with any existing care plans.

Avoid contact with other members of your household as much as possible

If you have symptoms of COVID-19, it is important to reduce the spread of infection to others in your household as much as possible.

You should stay in a well-ventilated room with a window to the outside that can be opened, separate from other people in your home if this is possible. Keep the door closed.

Use a separate bathroom from the rest of the household, if available. If you have to share these facilities, regular cleaning will be required. If a separate bathroom is not available, consider drawing up a bathroom rota for washing or bathing. You should use the facilities last, before thoroughly cleaning the bathroom. You should use separate towels from other household members, both for drying yourself after bathing or showering and for hand hygiene purposes.

You should avoid using shared spaces such as kitchens whilst others are present. Take your meals back to your room to eat. Use a dishwasher (if available) to clean and dry your used crockery and cutlery. If this is not possible, wash them by hand using detergent and warm water and dry them thoroughly, using a separate tea towel.

If you have a clinically vulnerable or clinically extremely vulnerable person living with you

Where possible, arrange for anyone who is clinically vulnerable or clinically extremely vulnerable to move out of your home, to stay with friends or family for the duration of your home isolation period.

If you cannot arrange for vulnerable people to move out of your home, stay away from them as much as possible, following the guidance here. For the clinically extremely vulnerable please follow the Shielding guidance.

Those who are clinically vulnerable or clinically extremely vulnerable should be supported to take precautions to minimise their contact with other people in your household, regardless of whether others have symptoms or not. They should minimise time spent in shared spaces such as kitchens, bathrooms and sitting areas. Any shared spaces should be well ventilated.

If they can, clinically vulnerable or clinically extremely vulnerable people should use a separate bathroom from the rest of the household. If this is not possible, consider drawing up a rota for bathing, with the clinically vulnerable or clinically extremely vulnerable person using the facilities first. They should use separate towels from the rest of the household, both for drying themselves after bathing or showering and when washing their hands.

If they can, clinically vulnerable and clinically extremely vulnerable members of the household should have their meals in their own rooms. If you have one, use a dishwasher to clean and dry the family’s used crockery and cutlery. If this is not possible, wash them using your usual washing up liquid and warm water and dry them thoroughly. If the clinically vulnerable or clinically extremely vulnerable person is using their own utensils, remember to use a separate tea towel for drying these.

It will be difficult for some people to separate themselves from others at home. You need to do your very best to follow this guidance and everyone in your household should regularly wash their hands, avoid touching their face, and clean frequently touched surfaces.

Wash your hands often

Clean your hands frequently by washing them with soap and water for 20 seconds or using hand sanitiser. This will help protect you and the people you live with. This is one of the most effective ways of reducing the risk of passing infection to others.

Cover your coughs and sneezes

Cover your mouth and nose with disposable tissues when you cough or sneeze. If you do not have a tissue, sneeze into the crook of your elbow, not into your hand. Dispose of tissues into a rubbish bag and immediately wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds or use a hand sanitiser.

If you have a carer, they should use disposable tissues to wipe away any mucus or phlegm after you have sneezed or coughed. Then they should wash their hands with soap and water for 20 seconds.

Face coverings

Used correctly, a face covering may help to protect others by reducing the transmission of COVID-19.

If you have symptoms of COVID-19 or a positive test result and you live with others, consider using a face covering inside your home when spending time in shared parts of the household, in addition to avoiding contact with other members of the household as much as possible. Stay at home for at least 10 days from when the symptoms started or from the date of your test, wearing a face covering does not replace this.

Further guidance on the use of face coverings is available along with instructions on how to make your own face covering.

People who are self-isolating, and members of their household, should double bag disposable face coverings and store them for 72 hours before putting them in a ‘black bag’ waste bin.

Cleaning and disposal of waste

When cleaning you should use your usual household products, like detergents and bleach, as these will be very effective at getting rid of the virus on surfaces. Clean frequently touched surfaces such as door handles, handrails, remote controls and table tops. This is particularly important if you have a clinically vulnerable or clinically extremely vulnerable person in the house.

Clean a shared bathroom each time you use it, for example, by wiping the surfaces you have touched.

Personal waste (such as used tissues) and disposable cleaning cloths can be stored securely within disposable rubbish bags. These bags should be placed into another bag, tied securely and kept separate from other waste. This should be put aside for at least 72 hours before being put in your usual external household waste bin.

Other household waste can be disposed of as normal.

Laundry

To minimise the possibility of dispersing virus through the air, do not shake dirty laundry.

Wash items in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. All dirty laundry can be washed in the same load.

If you do not have a washing machine, wait a further 72 hours after your self-isolation has ended when you can then take the laundry to a public launderette.

Do not share towels, including hand towels and tea towels.

Do not have visitors in your home

Do not invite or allow social visitors, such as other friends or family, to enter your home.

If you or a family member receive essential care in your home, then carers should continue to visit. Carers should follow the relevant guidance to reduce the risk of you passing on the infection.

If you have pets in the household

COVID-19 in the UK is spread between humans. There is limited evidence that some animals, including pets, can become infected with SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) following close contact with infected humans.

At this time, there is no evidence that pets can transmit the disease to humans, however, you should wash your hands after handling your pets or their waste.

What you can do to help yourself get better

Drink water to keep yourself hydrated. You should drink enough during the day so your urine is a pale clear colour.

You can use over-the-counter medications, such as paracetamol, to help with some of your symptoms. Use these according to the instructions on the packet or label and do not exceed the recommended dose.

If you or your family need to seek medical advice

Seek prompt medical attention if your illness or the illness of someone in your household is worsening. If it’s not an emergency, contact the NHS 111 online COVID-19 service. If you have no internet access, call NHS 111.

If it is a medical emergency and you need to call an ambulance, dial 999 and inform the call handler or operator that you or your relative have COVID-19 symptoms.

All routine medical and dental appointments should usually be cancelled while you and the family are staying at home. If you are concerned or have been asked to attend in person within the period you are self-isolating, discuss this with your medical contact first (for example, your GP or dentist, local hospital or outpatient service), using the number they have provided.

Looking after your wellbeing while staying at home

Staying at home for a prolonged period can be difficult, frustrating and lonely for some people, and you or other household members may feel low. It can be particularly challenging if you don’t have much space or access to a garden.

It’s important to remember to take care of your mind as well as your body and to get support if you need it. Stay in touch with family and friends over the phone or on social media. There are also sources of support and information that can help, such as the Every Mind Matters website.

Think about things you can do during your time at home. People who have stayed at home for a week or more have kept themselves busy with activities such as cooking, reading, online learning and watching films. If you feel well enough you can take part in light exercise within your home.

Many people find it helpful to remind themselves why what they are doing is so important. Hopefully, none of your family will experience anything more than mild symptoms, but some people are badly affected by COVID-19. By staying home, you are helping to protect your friends and family, and other people in your community, as well as making sure the NHS does not get overwhelmed.

There are things that you can do to help make self-isolation easier. These include:

  • planning ahead and thinking about what you will need in order to be able to stay at home for the full duration of isolation
  • talking to your employer, friends and family to ask for their help to access the things you will need while staying at home
  • thinking about and planning how you can get access to food and other supplies, such as medications, that you will need during this period
  • asking friends or family to drop off anything you need or ordering supplies online, but make sure these are left outside your home for you to collect
  • ensuring that you keep in touch with friends and family over the phone or through social media
  • thinking about things you can do during your time at home. People who have successfully completed a period of staying at home have kept themselves busy with activities such as cooking, reading, online learning and watching films
  • planning out the full days of your self-isolation on a calendar, which many people find helpful. You may also find it helpful to plan in advance what you will do if, for example, someone in your household were to feel much worse, such as having difficulties breathing
  • remembering that physical exercise can be good for your wellbeing, when you are feeling better. Look for online classes or courses that can help you take light exercise in your home

If you are breastfeeding while infected

There is currently no evidence to suggest that the virus can be transmitted through breast milk. Infection can be spread to the baby in the same way as to anyone in close contact with you. The current evidence is that children with COVID-19 get much less severe symptoms than adults. The benefits of breastfeeding outweigh any potential risks of transmission of the virus through breast milk or by being in close contact; however, this will be an individual decision and can be discussed with your midwife, health visitor or GP by telephone.

If you or a family member are feeding with formula or expressed milk, you should sterilise the equipment carefully before each use. You should not share bottles or a breast pump with someone else.

You can find more information at the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists website.

Ending self-isolation and household isolation

Ending self-isolation

If you have had symptoms of COVID-19 or a positive test, then you may end your self-isolation after 10 days and return to your normal routine if you do not have symptoms other than cough or loss of sense of smell or taste. If you still have a high temperature, keep self-isolating until your temperature returns to normal and seek medical advice.

After 10 days, if you just have a cough or a loss of, or change in, your normal sense of taste or smell (anosmia), you do not need to continue to self-isolate. This is because a cough or anosmia can last for several weeks once the infection has gone. The 10-day period starts from the day when you first became ill.

If you continue to feel unwell and have not already sought medical advice, you should use the NHS 111 online COVID-19 service. If you do not have internet access, call NHS 111. For a medical emergency dial 999.

Ending household isolation

After 10 days, if the first person to become ill feels better and no longer has symptoms other than cough or loss of sense of smell/taste they can return to their normal routine.

If you live with others, then everyone else in the household who remains well should end their isolation after 14 days. This 14-day period starts from the day the first person in the household became ill. People in the household who remain well after 14 days are unlikely to be infectious.

If anyone in the household becomes unwell during the 14-day period, they should arrange to have a test to see if they have COVID-19 – go to testing to arrange. If their test result is positive, they need to follow the same advice for people with COVID-19 symptoms – that is, after 10 days of their symptoms starting, if they feel better and no longer have symptoms other than cough or loss of sense of smell or taste – they can also return to their normal routine. However, if their test result is negative, they need to continue with isolation as part of the household for the full 14 days.

Should someone develop COVID-19 symptoms late in the 14-day household isolation period (for example, on day 10 or later) the isolation period for the rest of the household does not need to be extended. Only the person with new COVID-19 symptoms has to stay at home for at least a further 10 days and should arrange to have a test to see if they have COVID-19 – go to testing to arrange.

At the end of the 14-day period, anyone in the household who has not become unwell can return to their normal routine.

If any person in the household with COVID-19 symptoms has not had any signs of improvement and has not already sought medical advice, they should use the NHS 111 online COVID-19 service. If they do not have internet access, they should call NHS 111. For a medical emergency, they should dial 999.

A cough or anosmia (a loss of, or change, in the sense of taste or smell), may persist for several weeks in some people, despite the infection having cleared. A persistent cough or anosmia does not mean someone needs to continue to self-isolate for more than 10 days.

After ending self-isolation and/or household isolation

What to do if you have another episode of COVID-19 symptoms after the end of your first period of self-isolation or household isolation

If you develop COVID-19 symptoms again at any point after ending your first period of staying at home (self-isolation or household isolation), follow this guidance on self-isolation again.

This means stay at home for at least 10 days from when your symptoms started if you live alone and arrange to have a test. If you live in a household, stay at home for at least 10 days from when your symptoms started, arrange a test for yourself, and all other household members need to stay at home for 14 days.

This will help to ensure that you are continuing to protect others within your household and in your community by minimising the amount of infection that is passed on.

If you previously tested positive for COVID-19 and have another episode of symptoms, do you need to self-isolate again?

If you have tested positive for COVID-19, you will probably have developed some immunity to the disease. But it cannot be guaranteed that will happen in all cases, nor exactly for how long that will last.

If you have previously tested positive but develop symptoms again, self-isolate for at least 10 days from onset of symptoms and arrange to have a test. If you live in a household, all other household members need to stay at home for 14 days.

If you are concerned about your new possible COVID-19 symptoms, use the NHS 111 online COVID-19 service. If you do not have internet access, call NHS 111. For a medical emergency dial 999.

New legal requirements for self-isolation

From 28 September, you could be fined if you do not stay at home and self-isolate following a positive test result for COVID-19, or if you are contacted by NHS Test and Trace and instructed to self-isolate because you are a contact of someone who has had a positive test result. From this date, if you test positive for COVID-19, it will also be an offence to knowingly provide false information about your close contacts to NHS Test and Trace. Failure to comply with these requirements may result in a fine of up to £10,000. These regulations will only apply in England.

From 28 September, you may be entitled to a one-off payment of £500 through the Test and Trace Support Payment scheme if you are required to stay at home and self-isolate. Local authorities will be putting arrangements in place to make these payments, with further details to be made available shortly. You will be eligible if you live in England and meet all the following criteria:

  • you have been asked to self-isolate by NHS Test and Trace
  • you are employed or self-employed
  • you cannot work from home and will lose income as a result
  • you are claiming at least one of the following benefits: Universal Credit, Working Tax Credits, income-related Employment and Support Allowance, income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance, Income Support, Pension Credit or Housing Benefit

Guidance on shielding and protecting people defined as extremely vulnerable from COVID-19

Who this guidance is for

This guidance is for adults and children in England who are clinically extremely vulnerable.

If you’re clinically extremely vulnerable you should have received a letter confirming this or have been told directly by your GP or hospital clinician.

Introduction

If you’re clinically extremely vulnerable you were advised to take extra precautions during the peak of the pandemic in England. This is known as ‘shielding’.

The government is advising that you do not need to shield at the moment. This is because the rates of transmission of coronavirus (COVID-19) in the community have fallen significantly.

There is specific guidance on what will happen if there is a local lockdown in your area.

This guidance is government advice and it’s your personal choice whether to follow it.

What has changed

The guidance for the clinically extremely vulnerable is that shielding has been paused. This means:

  • you do not need to follow previous shielding advice
  • you can go to work as long as the workplace is Covid-secure, but should carry on working from home wherever possible
  • clinically extremely vulnerable children should attend education settings in line with the wider guidance on reopening of schools and guidance for full opening: special schools and other specialist settings
  • you can go outside as much as you like but you should still try to keep your overall social interactions low
  • you can visit businesses, such as supermarkets, pubs and shops, while keeping 2 metres away from others wherever possible or 1 metre, plus other precautions
  • you should continue to wash your hands carefully and more frequently than usual and that you maintain thorough cleaning of frequently touched areas in your home and/or workspace
  • you will no longer receive free food parcels, medicine deliveries and basic care from the National Shielding Service

For practical tips on staying safe, see the guidance on meeting with others safely.

You will still be able to get:

  • local volunteer support by contacting your local authority
  • prescriptions, essential items and food you buy delivered by NHS Volunteer Responders
  • priority slots for supermarket deliveries (if you previously registered for free food parcels)

If transmission of COVID-19 increases

You could be advised to shield again if the situation changes and there is an increase in the transmission of COVID-19 in the community.

Your name will be kept securely on the shielded patient list by NHS Digital. We will write to you if the advice changes. Any national changes will be reflected in this guidance.

In the event of a local lockdown, see the information below and visit your local authority’s website for further guidance.

If you’re clinically extremely vulnerable, you are advised not to enter any area where shielding advice is in place.

Definition of ‘clinically extremely vulnerable’

Expert doctors in England have identified specific medical conditions that, based on what we know about the virus so far, place some people at greatest risk of severe illness from COVID-19. Disease severity, medical history or treatment levels will also affect who is in this group.

Clinically extremely vulnerable people may include:

  • solid organ transplant recipients
  • people with specific cancers:
    • people with cancer who are undergoing active chemotherapy
    • people with lung cancer who are undergoing radical radiotherapy
    • people with cancers of the blood or bone marrow such as leukaemia, lymphoma or myeloma who are at any stage of treatment
    • people having immunotherapy or other continuing antibody treatments for cancer
    • people having other targeted cancer treatments that can affect the immune system, such as protein kinase inhibitors or PARP inhibitors
    • people who have had bone marrow or stem cell transplants in the last 6 months or who are still taking immunosuppression drugs
  • people with severe respiratory conditions including all cystic fibrosis, severe asthma and severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
  • people with rare diseases that significantly increase the risk of infections (such as severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), homozygous sickle cell)
  • people on immunosuppression therapies sufficient to significantly increase risk of infection
  • women who are pregnant with significant heart disease, congenital or acquired
  • other people who have also been classed as clinically extremely vulnerable, based on clinical judgement and an assessment of their needs. GPs and hospital clinicians have been provided with guidance to support these decisions

You can find out more about who is classed as clinically extremely vulnerable on theNHS Digital website.

If you do not fall into any of these categories, but you are still concerned, you should discuss your concerns with your GP or hospital clinician.

Work and employment

You can go to work as long as the workplace is Covid-secure, but should carry on working from home wherever possible.

You may be able to take up an alternative role or change your working patterns temporarily.

If you need support to work at home or in the workplace, you can apply for Access to Work.

Access to Work will provide support for the disability-related extra costs of working that are beyond standard reasonable adjustments an employer must provide.

Employment rights

If you have concerns, you can get advice on your specific situation and your employment rights by visiting the Acas website or calling the Acas helpline, 0300 123 1100.

If you have concerns about your health and safety at work, you can raise them with:

Statutory Sick Pay

As of 1 August, you are no longer eligible for Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) on the basis of being advised to shield by the government. Your employer should help you to transition back to work safely and support you to maintain good hand hygiene and distancing practice in your workplace if you are unable to work from home.

Support from NHS Volunteer Responders

NHS Volunteer Responders will offer support until at least December 2020 with:

  • collecting shopping, medication (if your friends and family cannot collect them for you) or other essential supplies
  • a regular, friendly phone call, either with someone else who has previously been advised to shield or with different volunteers
  • transport to medical appointments

Call 0808 196 3646 between 8am and 8pm to arrange support or visit the NHS Volunteer Responders website. Speak to your health care professional to arrange transport support.

Help from carers

Any carers or visitors who support you with your everyday needs can continue to visit unless they have any of the symptoms of COVID-19.

They should follow social distancing guidance where close or personal contact is not required.

If your carer is a paid carer visiting you in your home, they will find information on the provision of home care and personal protective equipment (PPE) in the provision of home care guidance and PPE for care workers delivering homecare guidance.

If you provide unpaid care, see the Guidance for those who provide unpaid care for friends of family.

If you’re in a local lockdown area

If you’re clinically extremely vulnerable and live in an area where additional public health measures require you to resume shielding, the government will write to you and advise you to stay at home and shield.

If you’re unable to work from home or a location outside the lockdown area:

In the event of a local lockdown, visit your local authority’s website for further guidance and follow the public health guidance for your local area.

If you work inside an area where clinically extremely vulnerable people are still being advised to shield, you are advised to work from home where possible, and not attend a workplace within the area where local restrictions are in place. If you live outside of that area, you may need to request a shielding letter as proof for your employer that you cannot attend your usual workplace.

Clinically extremely vulnerable children and young people

Specialists in paediatric medicine have reviewed the latest evidence on the level of risk posed to children and young people from COVID-19.

The latest evidence indicates that the risk of serious illness for most children and young people is low. In the future, we expect fewer children and young people will be included on the shielded patient list.

If a child or young person is removed from the shielded patient list, they will no longer be advised to shield in the future if coronavirus transmission increases.

To decide on whether a child or young person should be removed from the shielded patient list, you should talk to your paediatric specialist or GP. They will be in touch over the summer to discuss these decisions with you.

Annual flu programme

As part of the 2020 to 2021 flu vaccination programme, all other members of households of those who are identified as clinically extremely vulnerable at the time of the flu programme delivery are eligible for free flu vaccinations.

Most people who are clinically extremely vulnerable will already be eligible for a free flu vaccination.

Read further information about the annual flu programme.

Useful Links to Support Mental Health

Websites that have useful advice and mental health tips regarding Coronavirus include:

Doctors of the World – advice for patients on Coronavirus in various languages https://www.doctorsoftheworld.org.uk/coronavirus-information/

Mind website https://www.mind.org.uk/information-support/coronavirus-and-your-wellbeing/#collapse620

Anxiety UK https://www.anxietyuk.org.uk/blog/health-and-other-forms-of-anxiety-and-coronavirus/

OCD-UK https://www.ocduk.org/ocd-and-coronavirus-survival-tips/

Every Mind Matters https://www.nhs.uk/oneyou/every-mind-matters

BABCP Covid-19 Anxiety Blog http://letstalkaboutcbt.libsyn.com/coping-with-anxiety-about-coronavirus

Research in Practice has created a useful page full of information on domestic abuse and what options are available to victims during the COVID-19 crisis – https://www.researchinpractice.org.uk/all/news-views/2020/april/domestic-abuse-in-the-coronavirus-epidemic/

 

Employment and Income During Coronavirus

 

Information for employees

You can get £94.25 per week Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) if you’re too ill to work. It’s paid by your employer for up to 28 weeks.

 

If you cannot work while you are self-isolating because of coronavirus (COVID-19), you could get SSP for every day you’re in isolation. You must self-isolate for at least 4 days to be eligible. This includes individuals who are caring for people in the same household and therefore have been advised to do a household quarantine.

 

If you are not eligible for SSP – for example if you are self-employed or earning below the Lower Earnings Limit of £118 per week – and you have COVID-19 or are advised to self-isolate, you can now more easily make a claim for Universal Credit (UC) or new style Employment and Support Allowance. For more information on how to claim, please visit https://www.gov.uk/universal-credit and https://www.gov.uk/guidance/new-style-employment-and-support-allowance.

Proof of sickness

 

If you have COVID-19 or are advised to stay at home, you can get an ‘isolation note’ by visiting NHS 111 online, rather than visiting a doctor. For COVID-19 cases this replaces the usual need to provide a ‘fit note’ (sometimes called a ‘sick note’) after 7 days of sickness absence.

 

Furloughed workers

Find out if you’re eligible and how much you can claim to cover wages for employees on temporary leave (‘furlough’) due to coronavirus (COVID-19) by clicking here.

 

Universal Credit

If your salary is reduced as a result of these changes, you may be eligible for support through the welfare system, including Universal Credit.

Universal Credit is administered by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) and not Coventry City Council.

 

 

 

 

Support for rent costs

 

You should check your eligibility for Universal Credit, which is available for people in and out of work. Support for rental costs will be paid through Universal Credit.

 

Council Tax Support

Council tax Support is a means tested discount which helps low income households with the cost of Council Tax payments.

If your household is classed as being of working age, then you will need to pay at least 15 per cent of your council tax bill. You may receive help with the remaining 85 per cent depending on your income and the makeup of your household. Pension age households can receive up to 100 per cent support depending on their circumstances.

A 25% discount applies to all single households. Claim Council Tax SupportExemptions apply for people who are severely mentally impaired and live on their own.

You will receive your Council Tax bill in March telling you how much you have to pay. How to pay your Council Tax.

 

Housing rental payments

Contact your landlord if you’re struggling to pay rent; they may be able to give a rent reduction or accept late payment. Make sure you get something in writing. The Government announced on 18 March that landlords will not be able to apply to court to evict tenants for at least three months. That includes if you rent from a private landlord, a housing association or the council. The new law is expected to come in very soon.

 

Mortgage payments

Mortgage lenders have announced they won’t apply to court to repossess homeowners for 3 months starting from 19 March. They will also allow a three-month payment holiday for those struggling to cover their mortgage because of coronavirus. Be aware that this option may mean your monthly mortgage payment goes up after the payment holiday ends. Check if you have insurance that will cover your mortgage payments instead. For example, mortgage payment protection insurance or through your current account

 

Information for self-employed

 

If you are self-employed and you have COVID-19 or are advised to self-isolate, you can now more easily make a claim for Universal Credit (UC) or new style Employment and Support Allowance. For more information on how to claim, please   visit https://www.gov.uk/universal-credit and https://www.gov.uk/guidance/new-style-employment-and-support-allowance.

 

If you are self-employed and receiving Universal Credit and you have COVID-19 or are advised to self-isolate, the requirements of the Minimum Income Floor will be temporarily relaxed. This change took effect on 13 March and will last for the duration of the outbreak, to ensure that self-employed UC claimants will receive support.

If you need to claim Universal Credit but have COVID-19 or are self-isolating, you will now be able to claim and to access advance payments upfront without needing to attend a Jobcentre Plus.

 

If you’re self-employed, Income Tax payments due in July 2020 under the Self-Assessment system can be deferred to January 2021.

 

Businesses

 

All businesses and self-employed people in financial distress, and with outstanding tax liabilities, may be eligible to receive support with their tax affairs through HMRC’s Time To Pay service. These arrangements are agreed on a case-by-case basis and are tailored to individual circumstances and liabilities.

Please follow the link for more information based on the size of your business:   https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/support-for-those-affected-by-covid-19/support-for-those-affected-by-covid-19

 

Free advice

You can receive free and impartial advice on a range of matters from organisations including:

  • Consumer rights: Free consumer protection advice from the Government on issues including contracts, goods and services
  • Employee rights: Free advice on worker’s rights from the Government
  • Money Advice Service: Free and impartial money advice from an organisation set up by the Government
  • Citizens Advice Service: Free advice on a range of topics including debt, money and finances; law and court and consumer rights
  • Shelter: Free advice on issues such as housing, homelessness, eviction, repairs and repossession

Coventry specific support

Coventry City Council Customer Services  https://www.coventry.gov.uk/

Passionate and dedicated support from housing, benefits, bin collection and recycling, to education, care and safeguarding and many other areas.

Coventry Refugee and Migrant Centre  https://www.covrefugee.org/

Coventry Refugee and Migrant Centre (CRMC) welcomes and empowers asylum seekers, refugees and other migrants in Coventry to rebuild their lives and achieve their potential.

Coventry Family Hubs  https://www.coventry.gov.uk/familyhubs

The family hub model is an approach to the delivery of early help services centralised around a building, where a number of different services providing information and support to families, children and young people are based. They will provide early help and support for families, children and young people aged 0 – 19 years up to age 24 where a young person has a disability.

Coventry Foodbank  https://coventry.foodbank.org.uk/

We don’t think anyone in our community should have to face going hungry. That’s why we provide three days’ nutritionally balanced emergency food and support to local people who are referred to us in crisis. We are part of a nationwide network of foodbanks, supported by The Trussell Trust, working to combat poverty and hunger across the UK.

 

 

Coventry Jesus Centre  https://www.coventryjesuscentre.org.uk/

Jesus Centres are places where we provide services to restore dignity and create community. Friendship and help are available for every type of person. The homeless and disadvantaged find a particular welcome at Jesus Centre. They continue to offer ESOL and Conversation Cafes. Please email info@coventryjesuscentre.org.uk for more information.

Central England Law Centre Coventry  https://www.centralenglandlc.org.uk/

We provide free specialist legal advice to those most in need and use legal processes to fight social exclusion.  We advocate for people, challenge unfair decisions, take cases to the highest courts and work in partnerships with other support services.

Coventry Women’s Partnership  http://www.fwt.org.uk/social/coventry-womens-partnership/

This is a city-wide programme that aims to improve economic outcomes for women by providing access to skills, training, confidence building, support into employment and help with overcoming barriers.

Partners:

Foleshill Women’s Training  http://www.fwt.org.uk/

Coventry Haven Women’s Aid  https://www.coventryhaven.co.uk/

CRASAC  http://www.crasac.org.uk/

KairosWWT  https://kairoswwt.org.uk/

Coventry Law Centre   https://www.centralenglandlc.org.uk/

 

St Francis Assisi Church https://www.stfranciscoventry.org/

We are a lively and busy church based on Links Road – open throughout the week for a wide range of activities and community support including free meals, ESOL classes, work clubs, volunteering and many other interesting workshops.

 

Carriers of Hope  https://www.carriersofhope.org.uk/

Dedicated to helping Asylum Seekers, Refugees and Eastern European Migrants in the Coventry Area. We can help you with food, furniture items, clothes, baby items, toys, toiletries and other essential items.

Positive Youth Foundation  https://www.positiveyouthfoundation.org/

Supporting young people to achieve their potential in all areas of life.

Positive Youth Foundation is offering an employment hotline for young people aged 15-24! Those who want advice can call 07958 325426 on Monday and Friday.

Share My Language Rhymetime  https://fo-fo.facebook.com/events/coventry-library/share-my-language-rhymetimes/2305193513082041/

A fascinating activity session for children and parents with songs, music, poems and lots of interesting and entertaining educational elements.

Citizens Advice have advice on employment, managing financially and how to access the right support and benefits – https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/health/coronavirus-what-it-means-for-you/

Loan Shark Advice 

What is a ‘Loan Shark’?

A loan shark is a moneylender who charges extremely high rates of interest on people who borrow money from them, typically under illegal conditions.

The England Illegal Money Lending Team (IMLT) recognise that this period may be one of increased financial pressure for some people.

The Team is fully committed to ensuring that illegal money lenders (loan sharks) do not take advantage and profit from other people’s hardship.

The Stop Loan Sharks helping service (0300 555 2222) remains open and fully operational during the COVID-19 pandemic. Officers encourage not only victims but friends, family members and the wider community to come forward if they suspect someone is suffering at the hands of loan sharks.

 

Education

 

Some young people may be eligible to receive digital devices and Internet access to support remote learning.

 

This includes

  • care leavers
  • children and young people aged 0 to 19 with a social worker
  • disadvantaged year 10 pupils

 

People aged 16 to 19 without a suitable device for education will be eligible for support through the 16 to 19 Bursary Fund. Those offering 16 to 19 education should visit the 16 to 19 Bursary Fund to find out about eligibility for relevant funding and support.

 

For more information and to apply for digital devices and/or Internet access, please go to https://www.gov.uk/guidance/get-help-with-technology-for-remote-education-during-coronavirus-covid-19#who-is-eligible-to-receive-digital-devices-and-internet-access

 

Online Learning Resources

Every weekday CRMC is running Kahoot ESOL challenges! To get involved with videos and challenges, request to join the Facebook group that can be found below! https://www.facebook.com/groups/514046279309410/?ref=group_header

 

St Francis Employability is running quizzes & videos posted to its Facebook page and website! Click the link below to find out more and get involved https://en-gb.facebook.com/stfcov

 

This Facebook page offers regular maths lessons for FREE whilst schools are closed. They are pitched at KS1, 2 and 3 level. Click the link to discover more https://www.facebook.com/pg/hykmaths/events/?ref=page_internal

 

Maddie Moate is doing a range of free science videos on YouTube for children! To check them out go to https://www.youtube.com/user/maddiemoate

Younger children may be interested in Share My Language Rhymetime sessions held every Thursday at 11am on Facebook Live (MiFriendly Cities page). This activity session for children and parents includes songs, music, rhymes and lots of interesting and entertaining educational elements – specifically focused on cultural and language exchange. https://fo-fo.facebook.com/events/coventry-library/share-my-language-rhymetimes/2305193513082041/

Follow @covlibraries on Facebook and Twitter for some suggested reading and information on books that available electronically https://www.facebook.com/pg/covlibraries/

 

Free School Meals

 

During this time, the Government has extended its Free School Meals provision to some children with families that have no recourse to public funds (NRPF)

 

The categories that might be eligible are:

 

  • Children of ‘Zambrano Carers’
  • Children of families granted leave to remain under Article 8 European Convention on Human Rights
  • Children of families are supported under Section 17 Children Act 1989 and that have No Recourse to Public Funds
  • Children of a subset of failed asylum seekers supported under Section 4 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999

 

Please click here for more advice on eligibility and guidance on how to apply.

Routine Vaccinations 

Vaccination is the most important thing we can do to protect ourselves and our children against ill health. They prevent up to 3 million deaths worldwide every year.

Since vaccines were introduced in the UK, diseases like smallpox, polio and tetanus that used to kill or disable millions of people are either gone or seen very rarely.

Other diseases like measles and diphtheria have been reduced by up to 99.9% since their vaccines were introduced.  However, if people stop having vaccines, infectious diseases may quickly spread again.

Doctors and nurses in Coventry are eager to continue immunisations during the COVID-19 pandemic to protect residents and they want to re-assure people that they have worked hard to keep women and families safe from COVID-19.  Please note that all routine childhood vaccinations are free.

All vaccines are thoroughly tested to make sure they will not harm you or your child.

It often takes many years for a vaccine to make it through the trials and tests it needs to pass for approval.

Speak to your GP practice or your Health Visitor if you’re worried about you or your child having a vaccine.  You can text your Health Visitor on CHAT Health: 07507329114 or through Facebook FB @coventryhealthvisiting

Listen to a Coventry Health Visitor talking about the important of vaccinations her https://youtu.be/FpwiE3kIxcU

Key messages

  • Maintaining your baby’s vaccination schedule is vital to help ensure they are protected against dangerous preventable diseases https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/nhs-vaccinations-and-when-to-have-them/ https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/nhs-vaccinations-and-when-to-have-them/
  • Children must receive their pre-school booster before entering school; it’s never been more important to protect our school communities from preventable diseases
  • The vaccination programme has not stopped; it has continued to be offered by GP practices throughout the COVID19 crisis
  • It is safe to visit your GP surgery for routine vaccinations, they are taking extra precautions to ensure you remain safe. You can always ring and speak to them if you have any concerns
  • It is important to get routine vaccines on time and every time. Don’t wait until a disease outbreak
  • Protect your NHS and get vaccinated
  • Protect your school and community and get vaccinated

More information

For information about why vaccines are important and safe go to https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/why-vaccination-is-safe-and-important/

This webpage allows you to listen to a GP answering frequently asked questions about immunisations

A list of all NHS vaccinations and when to have them can be found here https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/nhs-vaccinations-and-when-to-have-them/

For in depth information about all of the vaccinations available please go to https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/

Pork gelatine can be found in the Mumps, Measles and Rubella (MMR) vaccination but there is another MMR vaccine that you can have that does not have pork gelatine in it, but you must ask your GP for this vaccine before your appointment.  Click here for more information on how and why pork gelatine is used in very few vaccines https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/vaccines-and-porcine-gelatine.  This leaflet is available in English, Urdu, Bengali and Arabic.

A range of information about vaccinations, the importance of vaccinations in a range of languages is available at https://medlineplus.gov/languages/childhoodimmunization.html

The Government has produced a leaflet explaining the importance of the MMR vaccine in Polish, Romanian and Somali which can be found here https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/mmr-for-all-general-leaflet

Tuberculosis vaccine (called the BCG)

In the UK, like many other countries, the BCG is offered to babies who are likely to come into contact with someone with Tuberculosis (TB). This includes babies who live in an area with high rates of TB or babies with parents or grandparents from a country with high rates of TB such as A leaflet about which babies should have the vaccine and why the vaccine is important can be found here in Arabic, Bengali, Farsi, Hindu, Nepali, Pashto, Punjabi, Somali and Urdu. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/tb-bcg-and-your-baby-leaflet

A campaign to raise awareness of the importance of routine childhood vaccinations with Coventry and Warwickshire residents started on the 29th June. This campaign is fully supported by Coventry GPs.

 

Ramadan 2020

This year, many people are asking “what does fasting during lock down look like?”

Social isolation, social distancing, government advice on working from home and not attending any large group events mean that faith congregational acts of worship for Muslims have been strictly reduced.

During this difficult time we have to remain within our homes, the houses we live in and only go out for essential food or a period of exercise as per government guidelines, maintaining a 2 metre distance while outside of home and washing our hands regularly.

This Ramadan we ask that, along with our Islamic faith leaders, that everyone:

  • Observe Ramadan at home, do not go to visit family or friend’s houses or meet them outside your home
  • Pray at home with people you share your home with and do not attend any Mosque or other family or friends houses to pray
  • Do not leave the house to distribute food but donate online or via food banks instead

In these unprecedented times it is imperative that public health is put first and in keeping with the UK Government guidance on social distancing, that Ramadan is celebrated in people’s own homes and the family they live with to avoid gathering in congregations at the Mosque or any open space to offer prayers.

#RAMADANATHOME


Ramadan 2020 is a very different experience for Muslims as we continue to adapt to changing circumstances during the Covid19 pandemic, adjusting not only our holy month but our daily lives in accordance with public health guidelines.

This Ramadan social distancing measures are still in place so we haven’t been able to return to  our normal routines. Thus, there have been no congregational acts of worship for Muslims outside of the home – no taraweeh prayers at the mosque or anywhere outside of our homes, no spiritual talks in the community or iftars with friends and family to attend. We have all been trying to adapt to these changes while still enjoying the spiritual lift and community spirit that Ramadan provides.

 

How to adapt our Ramadan

  • Organising taraweeh at home as a family and pray in congregation.
    • Streaming Islamic lectures or taraweeh in your home, either pre-recorded or live
    • Arranging virtual iftars with loved ones and community members through the many online video calling facilities available
    • Planning your iftar menus in advance so that you can limit multiple shopping trips given social distancing measures
    • Hydrating well for the long fasting days. Dehydration can lead to tiredness, headaches, lack of focus/concentration
    • Eating high energy, slow burn foods for suhoor (starting your fast)
    • Remaining energised throughout the workday, especially as we can experience heightened levels of anxiety during these times
    • Taking regular breaks to reflect and take time for yourself. Life can be full, and we try to fill it with more worship during Ramadan. We all want to pray more and this can help with anxiety but it is important to be good to yourself – sometimes it is quality over quality.

More information is at https://www.mcb.org.uk/ramadan

Advice from British Islamic Medical Association in the NHS

Fasting in the month of Ramadan is obligatory on all adult Muslims (with exceptions). Many patients and staff will be fasting or wanting to fast in Ramadan.
It helps if NHS frontline staff are aware of, and respect this important religious obligation, and how such beliefs may affect the different elements of care, particularly in light of the Covid-19 pandemic, which has seen more staff return to the frontline, a change in the way the NHS operates, and a surge in the use of personal protective equipment.

The patients’ perspective
The patient’s choice should be respected and advice should be offered on medical grounds. The Muslim Chaplain/Imam should be consulted where available.
If possible, hospital appointments should be given at appropriate times (i.e. outside prayer times –the Muslim patient will be aware of these times) or at the ending of the fast.
Arrangements for breaking of fast – availability of a quiet prayer space at prayer times would be appreciated.

What does not break the fast
• Injections
• Bloods taken (thumbprick or intravenous)
• Eye or ear drops
• Vaginal pessaries, urethral infusion, transdermal patch (i.e. nicotine patches) concentrate
oxygen, epidural analgesia and haemodialysis
• Eating and drinking out of forgetfulness

For more information please contact info@britishima.org

 

British Board of Scholars and Imams


The British Board of Scholars and Imans has published detailed guidance on how to celebrate
Ramadan from home: https://www.bssi.org.uk

 

Advice from Warwickshire Public Health and NHS Clinical Commissioning Groups in Warwickshire and Coventry


For more details follow these links:
https://publichealthmatters.blog.gov.uk/2020/04/22/stay-at-home-for-ramadan/

Advice in Arabic and other key languages in Warwickshire is on the EQuIP website here:
https://www.equipequality.org.uk/covid-19-updates

Most recent HM Government advice is available here: https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus

Coventry City Council website has useful information on social distancing, guidance on what to do is someone is unwell, keeping safe and support services available in different languages here:

https://www.coventry.gov.uk/coronavirus

Warwickshire County Council website has useful and informative materials on social distancing when shopping or outside in 8 different languages including Urdu, Gujarati and Nepalese
https://warwickshire.gov.uk/socialdistancing

Coventry and Warwickshire GP practices and Accident and Emergency Departments are still open


Local GPs and Accident and Emergency departments in Coventry and Warwickshire are still open during the COVID-19 situation, though how you access them might be slightly different than you’re used to.

 

Here’s a list of handy Do’s and Don’ts to explain how to see a GP:

Do Don’t
Ring your GP practice first if you
have any health concerns not related
to coronavirus. We are especially
keen to hear from you if you have a
new lump, unusual bleeding a new
problem that you think is significant or
are struggling with a chronic condition
such as diabetes or asthma.
Don’t go to your GP practice
unless asked to do so by a GP.
Be prepared to have your
appointment over the telephone or by
video consultation – you may not be
offered a face to face appointment.**if
you are be prepared that the nurse or
doctor may be wearing gloves, an
apron and a mask.
Don’t go to your GP if you have
symptoms of Coronavirus
– stay at
home and use the online 111
symptom checker or call NHS 111 if
you can’t get online.
Contact your GP if you have
concerns about cancer, heart
disease or a child who is ill
, but
please be aware that, for certain
conditions, you may be asked by your
GP to be seen at practice which isn’t
your own.
Don’t go to your GP for something
you could treat at home
, such as
hay fever, mild skin conditions or
fungal toe nails.

 

Accident and emergency at our local hospitals are also open and it is important
people don’t delay in seeking medical attention in a life-threatening  emergency, but again there are some things to keep in mind:

Do Don’t
Call 999 in a life-threatening
emergency without delay
. An
emergency is when someone is
seriously ill or injured and their life is
at risk. Life-threatening emergencies
can include:
• loss of consciousness
• a sudden confused state
• fits and seizures that aren’t
stopping
• chest pain
• breathing difficulties
• severe bleeding that can’t be
stopped
• severe allergic reactions
• severe burns or scalds
• suspected meningitis or sepsis
Call 999 immediately if you or
someone else is having a heart
attack or stroke. Every second counts
with these conditions.
Don’t go to A&E for anything
which isn’t a life-threatening
emergency
– ***call 111, your GP or
use the Urgent Treatment Centre
instead.
Visit NHS 111 online if is not a life
threatening emergency
but it’s not
something you can deal with yourself.
They may send you to the Urgent
Treatment Centre at City of Coventry
Walk-In Centre or book you a call
with your GP surgery.
Only call 111 if you can’t get online
or have no access to the internet.
Don’t go A&E if you have
symptoms of Coronavirus
– stay at
home and use the online 111
symptom checker, or call NHS 111 if
you can’t get online.

 

If you have an ongoing health condition for which you normally attend hospital, please be aware these services may be delivered in different ways than you’re used to. The hospital will contact to inform you of changes to your care.

Remember: If you have symptoms of coronavirus (a high temperature or
a new, continuous cough, use the online NHS 111 coronavirus service.
Only call 111 if you can’t get online.

 

The Muslim Council of Britain (MCB) has produced the following advice regarding Ramadan 2020 –

 

“In 2020 Ramadan will be a very different experience for Muslims all over the world due to the COVID-19 restrictions. Read on below for further COVID-19 guidance including #RamadanAtHome, or click here to read the full Ramadan 2020 guidance (PDF).”

 

“To help you with your #RamadanAtHome, the MCB is hosting a number of social and spiritual events on our social media channels, from daily Qur’an recitations at fajr time to virtual eco-iftars.”

Please go to https://mcb.org.uk/resources/ramadan/ for schedule information, and suggestions such as virtual Iftars.

 

Alternatively, Amina Koroma (@Akoroma08 on Twitter) has created a series of useful suggestions for Ramadan 2020 and how to utilise technology and platforms such as WhatsApp, which can be found here:

https://twitter.com/Mandy_Sanghera1/status/1250453053473460225?s=20

We have typed them up below, so that users can translate the content by clicking the orange circle with a ‘B’ in.

WhatsApp / Telegram

Set up a manageable group in your locality.

Do a call out on social media for those fasting alone or for the first time, to help build a community.

 

Set up tasks like the following

  • Suhoor wake up call
  • Salah reminders
  • Affirmations / accountability

Digital Itfars via…

  • Zoom
  • Facetime
  • Skype
  • Google Hangouts

Document your experience

  • Social media: Instagram, Tik Tok, YouTube
  • Use the following hashtags: #RamadanOnline #RamadanAtHome #RamadanOnLock or make your own, to build a digital archive of experiences
  • Journaling is an offline option

Goal setting

  • Set up to 3 goals
  • 3 goals in the month, 3 per week or 3 per day
  • Make sure it’s manageable

Online Halaqa

  • Use video conferencing to watch an online lecture
  • Madinah College – @MadinahCollege
  • Yaqeen Institute – yaqeeninstitute.org

Learn Arabic

  • If it’s on your to do list, there are Arabic language providers holding online classes during Ramadan
  • Arabic Institute – arabicinstitute.com

Secret Eid

  • Names in a generator
  • Assign giftees
  • Set a budget ie £5-£10
  • Send a gift to your nominee in time for Eid

Actual Eid

  • Be creative: Zoom, House Party, SnapChat, Tik Tok collage, Eid #DontRushChallenge fits

InShaAllah you would have made a strong online friendship group during this time. Make sure you meet up in real life when coronavirus is well and truly over.

 

 

She has also launched ‘Ramadan Online’ to build a digital network. Currently this is only for the Greater London area, but you can register your interest for extending this to another region by filling in this form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdyuN26c_wqi9Mw6YAh-0jTtb56Lpuq9nboe3pSB0cKaWMxoQ/viewform

 

To find out more about Ramadan Online follow @RamadanOnline on Twitter, or @Ramadanon_line on Instagram.

 

Deliveries

During this time, a lot of delivery companies such as the Royal Mail are limiting the contact they have with customers.

In the case of the Royal Mail, staff are not handing over hand-held devices to customers to get signatures, but will log the name of the person who accepts the delivery. Where an item won’t fit through your letterbox, they will place the item at your door, knock, and then step aside a safe distance while you retrieve your item.

To check the most recent updates from the Royal Mail please click the following link: https://www.royalmail.com/d8/coronavirus-protection

 

Transcription of Public Health COVID-19 Briefing for Migrant Communities

On the 15th April 2020, Coventry City Council’s Public Health Department presented a briefing online about the COVID-19 coronavirus, aimed at supporting key people and organisations from Coventry’s migrant communities in disseminating correct and useful information. Public Health have kindly transcribed the presentation for those who could not attend. Please see this below.

WHAT IS CORONAVIRUS?

  • New virus
  • We don’t have immunity
  • Transmission similar to other respiratory diseases – through coughs and sneezes of an infected person (directly or from surfaces)
  • Main symptoms:
    • High temperature
    • Persistent dry cough
  • Many people will have mild symptoms
  • Some groups of people seem more susceptible to the virus than others
  • Do not delay getting help if you’re worried. Trust your instincts.

HOW CAN YOU HELP?

  • Help people to understand the following key messages
    • Coronavirus symptoms
    • Stay at home to stop the infection spreading
    • Other ways to stop the infection spreading
    • What to do if a person shows symptoms
    • Multilingual advice is available
  • How can you do this?
    • Use social media-repost or retweet Coventry City Council messages once a day
    • Talk to people – by text or telephone
    • Promote Coventry City Council support map

Key messages

You should only leave the house for very limited purposes:

  • shopping for basic necessities, for example food and medicine, which must be as infrequent as possible
  • one form of exercise a day, for example a run, walk, or cycle – alone or with members of your household
  • any medical need, including to donate blood, avoid or escape risk of injury or harm, or to provide care or to help a vulnerable person
  • travelling for work purposes, but only where you cannot work from home
  • Cultural events such as Ramadan may have to be held differently

These reasons are exceptions – even when doing these activities, you should be minimising time spent outside of the home and ensuring you are 2 metres apart from anyone outside of your household.

HOW TO STOP THE INFECTION SPREADING?

  • Do
  • wash your hands with soap and water often – do this for at least 20 seconds
  • use hand sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available
  • wash your hands as soon as you get home
  • cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when you cough or sneeze
  • put used tissues in the bin immediately and wash your hands afterwards
  • Don’t
  • do not touch your eyes, nose or mouth if your hands are not clean

Self-isolation helps stop coronavirus spreading

Do not leave your home if you have symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) or live with someone who does. This is called self-isolation.

If you are self-isolating, you must:

  • not leave your home for any reason, other than to exercise once a day – but stay at least 2 metres (3 steps) away from other people
  • not go out to buy food or collect medicine – order them by phone or online, or ask someone else to drop them off at your home
  • not have visitors, such as friends and family, in your home
  • You can use your garden, if you have one.

HOW LONG TO SELF ISOLATE?

If you have symptoms of coronavirus, you’ll need to self-isolate for 7 days.  After 7 days:

  • if you do not have a high temperature, you do not need to self-isolate
  • if you still have a high temperature, keep self-isolating until your temperature returns to normal
  • You do not need to self-isolate if you just have a cough after 7 days. A cough can last for several weeks after the infection has gone.

If you live with someone who has symptoms, you’ll need to self-isolate for 14 days from the day their symptoms started. This is because it can take 14 days for symptoms to appear.

  • If more than 1 person at home has symptoms, self-isolate for 14 days from the day the first person started having symptoms.
  • If you get symptoms, self-isolate for 7 days from when your symptoms start, even if it means you’re self-isolating for longer than 14 days.
  • If you do not get symptoms, you can stop self-isolating after 14 days.

After self-isolation

  • You still need to stay at home when you finish self-isolating, but you can go out for essential trips such as buying food.

For a diagram of this guidance click on:

Click Here

 

Please promote COVID 19 guidance that is available in a range of languages

 

Local support during the pandemic is available at

https://www.coventry.gov.uk/coronavirus

The Community support section includes

  • Emergency Food Hubs 10 Emergency Food Hubs have been created or strengthened across the city. A central hub will coordinate referrals which can be made by an individual online or over the phone and will continue to support the many people already known to need this service locally. Referrals can be made by calling 08085 834 333
  • Operation Shield Support Service To support people who have been strongly advised to stay at home at all times and avoid any face-to-face contact for a period of at least 12 weeks.
  • Support for rough sleepers – During the COVID-19 (coronavirus) emergency, all known rough sleepers and people using night shelters in Coventry had been offered accommodation. This includes those with No Recourse to Public Funds.

Finding community support services A map of support services has been developed please click the buttons at the top to filter what type of support you are looking for or click the buttons down the side to see what is available in your ward. Below the map you will then see information including the name and contact details of each individual group

If you need help in finding the right support, our contact number is 08085 834333.

 

Other Useful Links 

“IOM UK has designed a Covid-19 Migrant Information Service to provide extra support to migrants in the challenging context of the Covid-19 crisis.

The info service includes:

  • a multilingual website www.covid19uk.iom.int
  • a telephone service 0800 464 3380.
  • to provide information to migrants living in the UK on 5 key topics: health, work, benefits, visas and immigration, housing and homelessness.

The website also provides a comprehensive overview of the various governmental and non-governmental support schemes that are available to migrants. Finally, it provides signposted information for users to get further information and/or begin the process of accessing support. The website is currently available in many languages: English, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Arabic, Chinese, Albanian and Vietnamese, with Polish to be added soon. The telephone service provides information to callers in any language, and is available on Freephone 0800 464 3380.”

Local GPs and Accident and Emergency departments are still open. To find out what you should and shouldn’t click here.

Irish Health Service has provided a 16-page information booklet and posters about COVID-19 in different languages – https://www.hse.ie/eng/services/news/newsfeatures/covid19-updates/partner-resources/covid-19-translated-resources/

Doctors of the World – advice for patients on Coronavirus in various languages https://www.doctorsoftheworld.org.uk/coronavirus-information/

The Traveller Movement have collated a series of resources and fact sheets specifically aimed at supporting Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities at this time. https://www.travellermovement.org.uk/index.php/covid-19

Joe Wicks is doing PE lessons live online every weekday at 9am. This will help people of all ages stay active and entertained https://www.facebook.com/JoeWicksTheBodyCoach/

Research in Practice has created a useful page full of information on domestic abuse and what options are available to victims during the COVID-19 crisis – https://www.researchinpractice.org.uk/all/news-views/2020/april/domestic-abuse-in-the-coronavirus-epidemic/

 

Every weekday CRMC is running Kahoot ESOL challenges! To get involved with videos and challenges, request to join the Facebook group that can be found below! https://www.facebook.com/groups/514046279309410/?ref=group_header

 

St Francis Employability is running quizzes & videos posted to its Facebook page and website! Click the link below to find out more and get involved https://en-gb.facebook.com/stfcov

 

Social Innovation Emerald Book Club is holding daily online stretching between 10:30-11am. To get involved, please contact them on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/EmeraldBookClub/

 

Positive Youth Foundation is offering an employment hotline for young people aged 15-24! Those who want advice can call 07958 325426 on Monday and Friday.

 

Younger children may be interested in Share My Language Rhymetime sessions held every Thursday at 11am on Facebook Live (MiFriendly Cities page). This activity session for children and parents includes songs, music, rhymes and lots of interesting and entertaining educational elements – specifically focused on cultural and language exchange. https://fo-fo.facebook.com/events/coventry-library/share-my-language-rhymetimes/2305193513082041/

Follow @covlibraries on Facebook and Twitter for some suggested reading to keep you busy during the COVID-19 crisis https://www.facebook.com/pg/covlibraries/

Sadhguru is providing daily meditation at 12:30pm on YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQ9xr7dmcpY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Section Icon Self-care

There are a lot of things that you can do to look after your own health and prevent yourself from becoming unwell. Many illnesses or symptoms can be treated at home with the help of a well-stocked medicine cabinet and plenty of rest.


Section Icon NHS Choices and NHS 111

If you’re not sure what kind of care you need, you’ll find lots of useful information and a free symptom checker online at NHS.uk. You can also ring 111 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for free confidential advice and information.


Section Icon Pharmacies

Your local pharmacist / chemist will be happy to advise you on common illnesses and the medicines you need to treat them.


Section Icon GPs

Your own GP is the best person to speak to about persistent health problems and illnesses that won’t go away. Your GP will make sure you are up to date with your immunisations, and will also ensure you are invited to be screened for a number of conditions, depending on your age and gender


Section Icon Out-of-hours / GP Service

When your own GP surgery is closed, you can access the out-of-hours service. The 111 service will be able to help you if you need to see a GP urgently in the evening or at a weekend.


Section Icon Emergency dental care

We do recommend that you find a regular dentist, and you can find one through NHS 111.  If you do not have a regular dentist and you need emergency care you should contact 111.


Section Icon Emergency Department or 999

Emergency Department and 999 services provide emergency care for people who have symptoms of serious illness or are badly injured.