General Information

Coronavirus (COVID-19)

The following information is from Public Health England and Gov.UK web pages. Last updated 22.03.2021

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Our Response as a Council

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National Guidance – COVID-19 Response – Spring 2021 

Roadmap out of lockdown From 8 March 2021

From 8 March, people in England will see restrictions start to lift and the government’s four-step roadmap offer a route back to a more normal life.

The success of the vaccination programme is one factor – so far over 17 million people have had their jabs – but by no means the whole story. The public have also risen to the challenge of suppressing COVID-19: by obeying the law; staying at home; getting tested when needed; isolating when required, and following the ‘hands, face, space’ and ‘letting fresh air in’ guidance.

Taken together, this means that even though absolute case numbers remain relatively high, we will be able to begin relaxing the current strict lockdown. While we must all remain vigilant – in particular against the threat from new COVID-19 variants – and continue to protect the NHS, a safe exit from lockdown can begin. It will take place in four steps; and at each step, we plan to lift restrictions across the whole of England at the same time.

In implementing this plan we will be guided by data, not dates, so that we do not risk a surge in infections that would put unsustainable pressure on the NHS. For that reason, all the dates in the roadmap are indicative and subject to change. There will be a minimum of five weeks between each step: four weeks for the scientific data to reflect the changes in restrictions and to be analysed; followed by one week’s advance notice of the restrictions that will be eased.

Only when the government is sure that it is safe to move from one step to the next will the final decision be made. The decision will be based on four tests:

  • the vaccine deployment programme continues successfully
  • evidence shows vaccines are sufficiently effective in reducing hospitalisations and deaths in those vaccinated
  • infection rates do not risk a surge in hospitalisations which would put unsustainable pressure on the NHS
  • our assessment of the risks is not fundamentally changed by new Variants of Concern

The government will continue to protect the public by ensuring local outbreaks are managed quickly and effectively and that we combat new dangerous variants, both within the UK and at the border. The government will also continue to support families and businesses throughout the steps set out in the roadmap – details of which will be set out by the Chancellor in the Budget on 3 March.

Step 1 – 8 and 29 March

Changes on 8 March

Education

In Step 1, our priority is to ensure that all children and students return safely to face-to-face education in schools and colleges from 8 March. Childcare and children’s supervised activities can also resume where necessary to enable parents to work or engage in similar activities. We are introducing twice-weekly rapid testing for secondary and college pupils – in addition to regular testing for all teachers – to reduce the chance of the virus spreading in schools.

Higher Education students at English universities on practical courses can also return from 8 March.

Social contact

People will be allowed to leave home for recreation and exercise outdoors with their household or support bubble, if they are eligible for one, or with one person from outside their household. Care home residents will also be allowed one regular visitor.

You must not leave, or be outside of your home except where necessary. You may leave the home to:

  • shop for basic necessities, for you or a vulnerable person
  • go to work, or provide voluntary or charitable services, if you cannot reasonably do so from home
  • exercise with your household (or support bubble) or one other person, this should be limited to once per day, and you should not travel outside your local area.
  • meet your support bubble or childcare bubble where necessary, but only if you are legally permitted to form one
  • seek medical assistance or avoid injury, illness or risk of harm (including domestic abuse)
  • attend education or childcare – for those eligible

If you do leave home for a permitted reason, you should always stay local – unless it is necessary to go further, for example to go to work. Stay local means stay in the village, town, or part of the city where you live.

If you are clinically extremely vulnerable you are advised to only go out for medical appointments, exercise or if it is essential. We recommend that you do not attend work

Meeting others

You cannot leave your home to meet socially with anyone you do not live with or are not in a support bubble with (if you are legally permitted to form one).

You may exercise on your own, with one other person, or with your household or support bubble. This should be limited to once per day, and you should not travel outside your local area.

Changes on 29 March

Social contact

The evidence shows that it is safer for people to meet outdoors rather than indoors. And this is why from 29 March, when most schools start to break up for the Easter holidays, outdoor gatherings (including in private gardens) of either 6 people (the Rule of 6) or 2 households will also be allowed, making it easier for friends and families to meet outside.

Business and activities

Outdoor sports facilities such as tennis and basketball courts, and open-air swimming pools, will also be allowed to reopen, and people will be able to take part in formally organised outdoor sports.

Travel

The ‘stay at home’ rule will end on 29 March but many restrictions will remain in place. People should continue to work from home where they can and minimise the number of journeys they make where possible, avoiding travel at the busiest times and routes. Travel abroad will continue to be prohibited, other than for a small number of permitted reasons. Holidays abroad will not be allowed, given it will remain important to manage the risk of imported variants and protect the vaccination programme. The government has launched a new taskforce to review global travel which will report on 12 April.

Step 2 – not before 12 April

Business and activities

Step 2, which will be no earlier than 12 April, will see the opening of non-essential retail; personal care premises such as hairdressers and nail salons; and public buildings, including libraries and community centres. Indoor leisure facilities such as gyms will also reopen (but only for use by people on their own or in household groups); as will most outdoor attractions and settings including outdoor hospitality venues, zoos, theme parks, and drive-in cinemas. Self-contained accommodation such as campsites and holiday lets, where indoor facilities are not shared with other households, can also reopen.

Hospitality venues will be allowed to serve people outdoors at Step 2 and there will be no need for customers to order a substantial meal with alcoholic drinks and no curfew, although customers must order, eat and drink while seated (‘table service’). Wider social contact rules will apply in all these settings to prevent indoor mixing between different households.

Events

While funerals can continue with up to 30 mourners, the number of people able to attend weddings, receptions and commemorative events such as wakes will rise to 15.

Step 3 – not before 17 May

Social contact

As part of Step 3, no earlier than 17 May, the government will look to continue easing limits on seeing friends and family wherever possible, allowing people to decide on the appropriate level of risk for their circumstances.

This means that most legal restrictions on meeting others outdoors will be lifted – although gatherings of over 30 people will remain illegal. Indoors, the Rule of 6 or 2 households will apply – we will keep under review whether it is safe to increase this.

As soon as possible and by no later than Step 3, we will also update the advice on social distancing between friends and family, including hugging. But until this point, people should continue to keep their distance from anyone not in their household or support bubble.

Business and activities

Most businesses in all but the highest risk sectors will be able to reopen. In all sectors, COVID-Secure guidance will remain in place and businesses may not cater for groups bigger than the legal limits. Indoor hospitality will reopen – and as in Step 2, venues will not have to serve a substantial meal with alcoholic drinks; nor will there be a curfew. Customers will, however, have to order, eat and drink while seated.

Other indoor locations to open up in Step 3 include indoor entertainment venues such as cinemas and children’s play areas; the rest of the accommodation sector, including hotels, hostels and B&Bs; and indoor adult group sports and exercise classes. The government will also allow some larger performances and sporting events in indoor venues with a capacity of 1,000 people or half-full (whichever is a lower number), and in outdoor venues with a capacity of 4,000 people or half-full (whichever is a lower number). In the largest outdoor seated venues, where crowds can be spread out, up to 10,000 people will be able to attend (or a quarter-full, whichever is lower).

Events

Up to 30 people will be able to attend weddings, receptions and wakes, as well as funerals. This limit will also apply to other types of significant life events including bar mitzvahs and christenings.

Review of social distancing

Finally, before Step 4 begins, the government will complete a review of social distancing and other long-term measures that have been put in place to cut transmission. This will inform decisions on the timing and circumstances under which the rules on 1 metre plus, the wearing of face coverings and other measures may be lifted. This will also inform guidance on working from home – which should continue wherever possible until this review is complete.

Step 4 – not before 21 June

Social contact

By Step 4 which will take place no earlier than 21 June, the government hopes to be in a position to remove all legal limits on social contact.

Business, activities and events

We hope to reopen remaining premises, including nightclubs, and ease the restrictions on large events and performances that apply in Step 3. This will be subject to the results of a scientific Events Research Programme to test the outcome of certain pilot events through the spring and summer, where we will trial the use of testing and other techniques to cut the risk of infection. The same Events Research Programme will guide decisions on whether all limits can be removed on weddings and other life events.

As we move through each of these phases in the roadmap, we must all remember that COVID-19 remains a part of our lives. We are going to have to keep living our lives differently to keep ourselves and others safe. We must carry on with ‘hands, face, space’. Comply with the COVID-Secure measures that remain in place. Meet outdoors when we can and keep letting fresh air in. Get tested when needed. Get vaccinated when offered. If we all continue to play our part, we will be that bit closer to a future that is more familiar.

Who this guidance is for

You should follow this guidance immediately. This is the law. There is additional guidance for households with a possible or confirmed coronavirus infection.

If you are clinically extremely vulnerable you are advised to follow shielding guidance. We recommend that you do not attend work, school, college or university. You should limit the time you spend outside the home. You should only go out for medical appointments, exercise or if it is essential.

Hands. Face. Space.

Approximately 1 in 3 people who have coronavirus have no symptoms and could be spreading it without realising it.

Remember – ‘Hands. Face. Space.’

  • hands – wash your hands regularly and for at least 20 seconds
  • face – wear a face covering in indoor settings where social distancing may be difficult, and where you will come into contact with people you do not normally meet
  • space – stay 2 metres apart from people you do not live with where possible, or 1 metre with extra precautions in place (such as wearing face coverings)

You should avoid all non-essential meetings and interactions. In all circumstances, you should follow the guidance on meeting others safely.

Reducing the chance of catching or spreading the virus in your home

Coronavirus spreads from person to person through small droplets, tiny airborne particles known as aerosols and through direct contact.

To reduce the chance of catching or passing on coronavirus to or from the people you live with, you should:

  • wash your hands regularly and for at least 20 seconds
  • regularly clean frequently touched surfaces
  • make sure you let plenty of fresh air into your home without getting uncomfortably cold. This should be balanced with other considerations such as comfort, safety and security.

There is further guidance on:

If you break the rules

The police can take action against you if you meet in larger groups. This includes breaking up illegal gatherings and issuing fines (fixed penalty notices).

You can be given a Fixed Penalty Notice of £200 for the first offence, doubling for further offences up to a maximum of £6,400. If you hold, or are involved in holding, an illegal gathering of over 30 people, the police can issue fines of £10,000.

Protecting people more at risk from coronavirus

If you are clinically vulnerable, you could be at higher risk of severe illness from coronavirus. There is additional guidance for people who are clinically extremely vulnerable. If you’re clinically extremely vulnerable we recommend that you do not attend work, school, college or university. You should limit the time you spend outside the home. You are advised to only go out for medical appointments, exercise or if it is essential.

Avoid car sharing with anyone from outside your household or your support bubble. See the guidance on car sharing.

If you need to use public transport, you should follow the safer travel guidance.

Advice for if you have COVID-19 Symptoms 

Who this guidance is for

It is important that we all take steps to reduce the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19) infection in the community to save lives and protect the NHS.

This guidance is for:

  • people with symptoms that may be caused by COVID-19, including those who are waiting for a test
  • people who have received a positive COVID-19 test result (whether or not they have symptoms)
  • people who currently live in the same household as someone with COVID-19 symptoms, or with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19

In this guidance a household means:

  • one person living alone
  • a group of people (who may or may not be related) living at the same address and who share cooking facilities, bathrooms or toilets and/or living areas. This may include students in boarding schools or halls of residence who share such facilities

This guidance also applies to people in your support bubble or childcare bubble.

Follow separate guidance if you have had contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 but do not currently live in the same household as them. If you have arrived in the UK from overseas you may also need to self-isolate.

Symptoms

The most important symptoms of COVID-19 are recent onset of any of the following:

  • a new continuous cough
  • a high temperature
  • a loss of, or change in, your normal sense of taste or smell (anosmia)

For most people, COVID-19 will be a mild illness. However, if you have any of the symptoms above, stay at home and arrange to have a test.

There are several other symptoms linked with COVID-19. These other symptoms may have another cause and are not on their own a reason to have a COVID-19 test. If you are concerned about your symptoms, seek medical advice.

Tests for COVID-19

Two types of test are currently being used to detect if someone has COVID-19:

  • Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) tests
  • Lateral Flow Device (LFD) tests or known as Community Testing

PCR tests detect the RNA (ribonucleic acid, the genetic material) of a virus. PCR tests are the most reliable COVID-19 tests. It takes some time to get the results because they are usually processed in a laboratory.

LFD tests detect proteins in the coronavirus and work in a similar way to a pregnancy test. They are simple and quick to use. LFD tests are not as accurate as PCR tests and are mainly used in people who do not have symptoms of COVID-19. Anyone who has a positive LFD test should have a PCR test to confirm the result within 48 hours.

Main messages

Anyone with COVID-19 symptoms or a positive test result must stay at home for the full isolation period. This is because they could pass it on to others, even if they don’t have symptoms.

It may be difficult for some people to separate themselves from others in their household. Not all these measures will be possible if you are living with children or have caring responsibilities but follow this guidance to the best of your ability in these circumstances.

If you have COVID-19 symptoms or have received a positive COVID-19 test result

Stay at home and self-isolate

If you develop symptoms of COVID-19, stay at home and self-isolate immediately. If you have a positive test result but do not have symptoms, stay at home and self-isolate as soon as you receive the results. Your household needs to isolate too.

Arrange to have a PCR test for COVID-19 if you have not already had one. Stay at home while you are waiting for a home test kit, a test site appointment or a test result. You can leave your home in certain circumstances, but do not go to work, school, or public areas and do not use public transport or taxis. Only leave your home to get to your test if you need to, observe strict social distancing advice and return immediately afterwards.

Your isolation period includes the day your symptoms started (or the day your test was taken if you do not have symptoms), and the next 10 full days. This means that if, for example, your symptoms started at any time on the 15th of the month (or if you did not have symptoms but your first positive COVID-19 test was taken on the 15th), your isolation period ends at 23:59 hrs on the 25th.

A positive PCR test result means you must complete your full isolation period. Your official isolation period starts immediately from when your symptoms started. If you do not have any symptoms and test positive via a LFD test you should self-isolate until you have taken a confirmatory PCR test. The official 10-day self-isolation period beings from the positive PCR result.

A positive LFD test result also means you must complete 10 days isolation, unless this is followed by a PCR test and the result is negative.

You can return to your normal routine and stop self-isolating after 10 full days if your symptoms have gone, or if the only symptoms you have are a cough or anosmia, which can last for several weeks. If you still have a high temperature after 10 days or are otherwise unwell, stay at home and seek medical advice.

If you are isolating because of a positive test result but did not have any symptoms, and you develop COVID-19 symptoms within your isolation period, start a new 10 day isolation period by counting 10 full days from the day following your symptom onset.

Most people with COVID-19 will experience a mild illness. Seek prompt medical attention if your illness or the illness of someone in your household is worsening.

Stay as far away from other members of your household as possible, especially if they are clinically extremely vulnerable. Wherever possible, avoid using shared spaces such as kitchens and other living areas while others are present and take your meals back to your room to eat. Wear a face covering or a surgical mask when spending time in shared areas inside your home.

Take exercise within your home, garden or private outdoor space. Follow the general advice to reduce the spread of the infection within your household.

If you have a negative COVID-19 PCR test result following a positive LFD test

If you have a PCR test following a positive LFD test, and the result is negative, you and your household can stop isolating.

If you have a negative COVID-19 PCR test result after being tested because you had symptoms

If your PCR test result is negative but you still have symptoms, you may have another virus such as a cold or flu. You should stay at home until you feel well. Seek medical attention if you are concerned about your symptoms.

You can stop isolating as long as:

Anyone in your household who is isolating because of your symptoms can also stop isolating.

After your isolation period has ended

If you have tested positive for COVID-19, you will probably have developed some immunity to the disease. However, it cannot be guaranteed that everyone will develop immunity, or how long it will last. It is possible for PCR tests to remain positive for sometime after COVID-19 infection. Anyone who has previously received a positive test result for COVID-19 should only be re-tested within a 90-day period if they develop any new symptoms of COVID-19.

If you develop COVID-19 symptoms at any point after ending your first period of isolation you and your household should follow the steps in this guidance again.

If you develop COVID-19 symptoms and had a positive test result more than 10 days ago, you should stay at home and seek medical advice.

NHS Test and Trace

You will receive a request by text, email or phone to log into the NHS Test and Trace[footnote 1] service website and provide information about your symptoms and when they started. The 3 main symptoms of COVID-19 are used to identify when someone should seek a test and when they should self-isolate from. You may have experienced other symptoms before developing any of the 3 main symptoms (a cough, high temperature or loss of smell or taste), and the timing of these other symptoms will be used to identify your contacts.

You will be asked about your recent contacts so that they can be given public health advice. They will not be told your identity. It is very important that you provide this information, as it will play a vital role in helping to protect your family, friends and the wider community.

If you are asked to self-isolate by NHS Test and Trace, including by the NHS COVID-19 app, you may be entitled to a payment of £500 from your local authority under the Test and Trace Support Payment scheme.

You could be fined if you do not stay at home and self-isolate following a positive PCRtest result for COVID-19 and you are notified by NHS Test and Trace that you need to self-isolate.

If you live in the same household as someone with COVID-19

Stay at home and self-isolate. Do not go to work, school, or public areas and do not use public transport or taxis.

Your isolation period includes the day the first person in your household’s symptomsstarted (or the day their test was taken if they did not have symptoms, whether this was an LFD or PCR test), and the next 10 full days. This means that if, for example, your 10 day isolation period starts on the 15th of the month, your isolation period ends at 23:59 hrs on the 25th and you can return to your normal routine.

If you do not have symptoms of COVID-19 yourself, you do not need a test. Only arrange a test if you develop COVID-19 symptoms or if you are asked to do so as part of a wider testing scheme. If for any reason you have a negative test result during your 10 day isolation period, you must continue to self-isolate. Even if you don’t have symptoms, you could still pass the infection on to others. Stay at home for the full 10 days to avoid putting others at risk.

If you develop symptoms while you are isolating, arrange to have a COVID-19 PCR test. If your test result is positive, follow the advice for people with COVID-19 to stay at home and start a further full 10 day isolation period. This begins when your symptoms started, regardless of where you are in your original 10 day isolation period. This means that your total isolation period will be longer than 10 days.

If other household members develop symptoms during this period, you do not need to isolate for longer than 10 days.

If you are identified as a contact and asked to self-isolate by NHS Test and Trace, including by the NHS COVID-19 app you may be entitled to a payment of £500 from your local authority under the Test and Trace Support Payment scheme.

Failure to comply with self-isolation may result in a fine, starting from £1,000. Parents or guardians are legally responsible for ensuring that anyone under 18 self-isolates if they test positive for COVID-19 and are contacted by NHS Test and Trace and told to self-isolate.

Visitors to the household

Do not invite or allow social visitors to enter your home, including friends and family. If you want to speak to someone who is not a member of your household, use the phone, email or social media.

If you or a family member receive essential care in your home, carers should continue to visit and follow the provision of home care guidance to reduce the risk of infection.

All non-essential in-house services and repairs should be postponed until the self-isolation period is completed.

How COVID-19 is spread

COVID-19 spreads from person to person through small droplets, aerosols and through direct contact. Surfaces and belongings can also be contaminated with COVID-19 when people with the infection cough or sneeze or touch them. The risk of spread is greatest when people are close to each other, especially in poorly ventilated indoor spaces and when people spend a lot of time together in the same room.

Social distancing, washing your hands and good respiratory hygiene (using and disposing of tissues), cleaning surfaces and keeping indoor spaces well ventilated are the most important ways to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

People who have COVID-19 can infect others from around 2 days before symptoms start, and for up to 10 days after. They can pass the infection to others, even if they have mild symptoms or no symptoms at all, which is why they must stay at home.

People who live in the same household as someone with COVID-19 are at higher risk of developing COVID-19. They could spread the disease to others even when feeling well, which is why they must stay at home.

How to limit close contact with others in the household if you have COVID-19

Spend as little time as possible in shared spaces such as kitchens, bathrooms and sitting areas. Avoid using shared spaces such as kitchens and other living areas while others are present and take your meals back to your room to eat. Observe strict social distancing.

Ask the people you live with to help by bringing your meals to you, helping with cleaning and by giving you space.

Use a separate bathroom from the rest of the household where possible. If a separate bathroom is not available, try and use the facilities last, before cleaning the bathroom using your usual cleaning products. The bathroom should be cleaned regularly.

You should use separate towels from other household members, both for drying yourself after bathing or showering and for drying your hands. Keep your room well-ventilated by opening a window to the outside.

Use a face covering or a surgical mask when spending time in shared areas inside your home to minimise the risk of spread to others. Used correctly, they may help to protect others by reducing the transmission of COVID-19 but they do not replace the need to limit your contact with other household members.

You can find more advice on reducing the risks from COVID-19 in your home at GermDefence.

Those who are clinically extremely vulnerable should be supported to minimise their contact with other people in the household during this period, regardless of whether others have symptoms or not.

Reducing the spread of COVID-19 in your household

Everyone should take the following steps to reduce the spread of infection within their household.

Wash your hands

This is an important way to reduce the risk of catching COVID-19 or passing it on to others. Wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds or use hand sanitiser, particularly after coughing, sneezing and blowing your nose and before you eat or handle food. Clean your hands frequently and avoid touching your face.

Cover coughs and sneezes

Cover your mouth and nose with disposable tissues when you cough or sneeze. If you do not have a tissue, cough or sneeze into the crook of your elbow, not into your hand.

Dispose of tissues into a rubbish bag and immediately wash your hands. If you have a carer, they should use disposable tissues to wipe away any mucus or phlegm after you have sneezed or coughed and then wash or sanitise their hands.

Clean your home to reduce spread of infection

Regularly clean frequently touched surfaces, such as door handles and remote controls, and shared areas such as kitchens and bathrooms. This is particularly important if you have a clinically extremely vulnerable person in the house.

Use standard household cleaning products like detergents and bleach to clean your home as these are very effective at getting rid of the virus on surfaces. Clean shared bathrooms each time they are used, especially the surfaces you have touched, using your usual bathroom cleaning products.

Cleaning cloths and personal waste such as used tissues and disposable face coverings should be stored in disposable rubbish bags. These bags should be placed into another bag, tied securely and put aside for at least 72 hours before being put in your usual external household waste bin. Other household waste can be disposed of as normal.

Use a dishwasher to clean and dry your crockery and cutlery. If this is not possible, wash them by hand using washing up liquid and warm water and dry thoroughly using a separate tea towel.

Laundry

To reduce the possibility of spreading the virus through the air, do not shake dirty laundry. Wash items in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. All dirty laundry can be washed in the same load. If you do not have a washing machine, wait a further 72 hours after your self-isolation has ended when you can then take the laundry to a public launderette.

Do not share towels, including hand towels and tea towels.

Ventilate indoor areas

Keep indoor areas well-ventilated with fresh air, especially shared living areas. To increase the flow of air you can:

  • open windows as much as possible
  • open doors
  • make sure that any vents are open and airflow is not blocked
  • leave extractor fans (for example in bathrooms) running for longer than usual with the door closed after use

Caring for pets

COVID-19 in the UK is spread between humans. There is limited evidence that some animals, including pets, can become infected with SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) following close contact with infected humans.

Pet owners who have COVID-19 or who are self-isolating with symptoms should restrict contact with pets and wash their hands thoroughly before and after interacting with their pet.

Looking after your health and wellbeing

Looking after your mental and physical wellbeing while staying at home

Staying at home and self-isolating for a prolonged period can be difficult, frustrating and lonely for some people and you or other household members may feel low. It can be particularly challenging if you do not have much space or access to a garden.

Remember to take care of your mind as well as your body and get support if you need it. There are many sources of support and information, such as guidance on looking after your mental health and wellbeing and on supporting children and young people.

Every Mind Matters provides simple tips and advice to take better care of your mental health, including a COVID-19 hub with advice for those staying at home.

Many people find it helpful to remind themselves why what they are doing is so important. By staying at home, you are helping to protect your friends and family, other people in your community and the NHS.

Things that you can do to help make staying at home easier:

  • keep in touch with friends and family over the phone or through social media
  • remember that physical exercise can be good for your wellbeing. Look for online classes or courses that can help you take light exercise in your home
  • plan ahead and think about what you will need to be able to stay at home for the full duration
  • ask your employer, friends and family for help to access the things you will need while staying at home
  • think about and plan how you can get food and other supplies, such as medication, that you will need during this period
  • check if your neighbourhood or local community has a volunteer system that could help bring you supplies or provide other support
  • ask friends or family to drop off anything you need or order supplies online or by phone, making sure these are left outside your home for you to collect
  • think about things you can do during your time at home such as cooking, reading, online learning and watching films
  • many people find it helpful to plan out the full 10 days. You may also find it helpful to plan in advance what you will do if, for example, someone in your household were to feel much worse

If you need help for a mental health crisis, emergency or breakdown, seek immediate advice and assessment. Even during the COVID-19 pandemic, urgent mental health support is available to adults and children around the clock. Find your local NHS helpline by searching for your postcode or home town in a new service finder.

If you need medical advice

Health and care services remain open to help people with all health conditions, including COVID-19. Most people with COVID-19 will experience a mild illness which can be managed at home. Find out more about managing the symptoms of COVID-19 at home.

All routine medical and dental appointments should be cancelled while you are staying at home. If you are concerned or have been asked to attend in person during this time, discuss this with your medical contact first (for example, your GP or dentist, local hospital or outpatient service).

Seek prompt medical attention if your illness or the illness of someone in your household is worsening. If it is not an emergency, contact the NHS 111 online COVID-19 service or NHS 111 for other health conditions. If you have no internet access, call NHS 111.

If it is a medical emergency and you need to call an ambulance, dial 999. Inform the call handler or operator that you or someone in your household has COVID-19 or symptoms if that is the case.

Financial or other practical support

Self-isolation is one of the most important things we can do to help stop the spread of the virus and protect our friends and family, our community and the NHS. If you have symptoms of COVID-19, have received a positive test result, or have been told you are a contact with someone who has, self-isolation is the only way to guarantee you won’t pass COVID-19 to others. If you are told to isolate, you should do so straight away. Find out what support you can get if you’re affected by coronavirus is available.

Ask your employer, friends and family for help to access the things you will need while staying at home. More information on accessing food and essential supplies is available.

Check if your neighbourhood or local community has a volunteer system that could help bring you supplies or provide other support. Ask friends or family to drop off anything you need or order supplies online or by phone, making sure these are left outside your home for you to collect.

If you are unable to work due to COVID-19, see guidance from the Department for Work and Pensions to find out about support available to you. You may be entitled to a one-off payment of £500 through the NHS Test and Trace Support Payment scheme if you are required to stay at home and self-isolate. You can apply for the NHS Test and Trace Support Payment online or through the NHS COVID-19 app.

You will be eligible if you live in England and meet all the following criteria:

  • you have been asked to self-isolate by NHS Test and Trace, including by the NHS COVID-19 app
  • you are employed or self-employed
  • you cannot work from home and will lose income as a result
  • you are claiming at least one of the following benefits:
  • you are claiming at least one of the following benefits:
    • Universal Credit
    • Working Tax Credits
    • income-related Employment and Support Allowance
    • income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance
    • Income Support
    • Pension Credit or Housing Benefit

Visit your local authority’s website for more information.

If you are breastfeeding

If you have symptoms of COVID-19, have tested positive or are living in a household with someone who has COVID-19, you may be concerned about the infection spreading to your baby if you are breastfeeding.

The benefits of breastfeeding outweigh any potential risks of transmission of the virus through breast milk or by being in close contact, however, this will be an individual decision. Talk to your midwife, health visitor or GP by telephone.

There is currently no evidence to suggest that the COVID-19 virus can be transmitted through breast milk. However, COVID-19 infection can be passed on to a baby in the same way as it can to anyone in close contact with you. The current evidence is that children with COVID-19 get much less severe symptoms than adults. If you or a family member are feeding with formula or expressed milk, sterilise the equipment carefully before each use. You should not share bottles or a breast pump with someone else.

You can find more information from the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

People with learning disabilities, autism or serious mental illnesses

Not all these measures will be possible if you, or those you live with, have conditions such as learning disabilities, autism or serious mental illnesses. Follow this guidance to the best of your ability, whilst keeping yourself and those close to you safe and well, ideally in line with any existing care plans.

Booking a test to check if you have coronavirus

There are two tests – those for people WITH symptoms, and those for people without.

For People With Symptoms

You can have a swab test to check if you have coronavirus (COVID-19) now.

Who can get a free test

You can only get a free NHS test if at least one of the following applies:

  • you have a high temperature
  • you have a new, continuous cough
  • you’ve lost your sense of smell or taste or it’s changed
  • you’ve been asked to get a test by a local council
  • you’re taking part in a government pilot project
  • you’ve been asked to get a test to confirm a positive result

You can also get a test for someone you live with if they have symptoms.

If you’re going into hospital

You may need to get tested if you’re due to have surgery or a procedure.

The hospital will arrange this for you. Contact your hospital department if you have any questions. ​

Who cannot get a free test

You cannot use this service to get a test if:

  • you’ve come to the UK from a high-risk country
  • you’re planning to leave the country
  • your employer or school has asked you to get a test but you have no symptoms

You can pay for a private test.

When to get a test

If you have symptoms, get a test as soon as possible.

Book a visit to a test site to have the test today. Test sites are open 7 days a week. Order a home test kit if you cannot get to a test site.

England and Northern Ireland

You need to get the test done in the first 8 days of having symptoms.

On days 1 to 7, you can get tested at a site or at home. If you’re ordering a home test kit on day 7, do it by 3pm.

On day 8, you need to go to a test site – it’s too late to order a home test kit

Scotland

You need to get the test done in the first 5 days of having symptoms. This allows you the best chance of preventing the spread of coronavirus to others. After 5 days you should still book a test if you have been advised to do so by a healthcare professional.

On days 1 to 4, you can get tested at a site or at home. If you’re ordering a home test kit on day 4, do it by 3pm.

On day 5, you need to go to a test site – it’s too late to order a home test kit.

Wales

You need to get the test done in the first 5 days of having symptoms.

On days 1 to 4, you can get tested at a site or at home. If you’re ordering a home test kit on day 4, do it by 3pm.

On day 5, you need to go to a test site – it’s too late to order a home test kit.

Get a free test online

Start now

Get help applying

If no tests are available online, do not call helplines to get a test. No extra tests are available through the helplines.

If you have other problems using the online service, call:

  • 119 if you’re in England, Wales or Northern Ireland
  • 0300 303 2713 if you’re in Scotland

Lines are open 7am to 11pm.

Stay at home if you have symptoms

If you’re getting a test because you have symptoms, you and anyone you live with must self-isolate until you get your result. This also applies to anyone in your support bubble (where someone who lives alone – or just with their children – can meet people from 1 other household).

You must also self-isolate if you cannot get a test.

What the test involves

The test involves taking a swab of the inside of your nose and the back of your throat, using a long cotton bud.

You can do the swab yourself (if you are aged 12 or over) or someone can do it for you. Parents or guardians have to swab test children aged 11 or under.

Getting a test for someone else

If other people you live with have symptoms, you can order tests for up to 3 of them.

If you’re applying for someone who’s 13 or over, check that they’re happy for you to get a test for them.

If you need medical advice about your symptoms

Get help at:

Call 999 if you feel very unwell or think there’s something seriously wrong.

Test for People Without Symptoms 

This is referred to as community testing/Lateral Flow Tests.

Community testing is for anyone who is not showing symptoms of coronavirus and there is no need to book an appointment.

It involves taking a Lateral Flow Test. This means that people who attend are guided through a process to take swabs from inside the nose and the back of the throat.  People carry out their own swabs and results are usually back in under an hour.

Key workers and those who cannot work from home are being urged to take regular tests to make sure they are not passing the virus on to colleagues, members of the public and loved ones. This will be key in slowing the virus.

All of our test centres provide you with a COVID-safe and secure environment.

Alan Higgs Centre
Allard Way
Coventry
CV3 1HW

Centre AT7 (Centre AT7 will re-open on 27 February) 
12 Bell Green Road
Coventry
CV6 7GP

Coventry Transport Museum
Millennium Place
Hales Street
Coventry
CV1 1JD

Hagard Community Centre
Remembrance Road
Coventry
CV3 3DG

Indian Community Centre
243 Cross Road
Foleshill
Coventry
CV6 5GP

Moat House Leisure and Neighbourhood Centre
Winston Avenue
Wood End
Coventry
CV2 1EA

Xcel Centre
Mitchell Avenue
Coventry
CV4 8DY

Opening hours

Monday – Friday: 8am to 6.30pm
Saturday and Sunday: 10am to 3pm

Who is eligible?

To take a test at our centres in Coventry, you must:

  • Be free of any symptoms of COVID-19. Anyone with symptoms should book a test at one of our five symptomatic NHS testing centres in the city. Visit the NHS website or phone 119 to do this.
  • Be a resident of Coventry, or work in the city
  • Be over the age of 2. Anyone between 2 and 17 will need to have a parent or appropriate adult with them.
  • Not have been instructed to isolate by NHS Test and Trace

Anyone with any of the main COVID symptoms should seek a test in the normal way – by dialling 119 or by visiting www.nhs.uk/coronavirus.

To find out more about testing, coronavirus or local restrictions and support, visit www.coventry.gov.uk/coronavirus.

Guidance on shielding and protecting people defined as extremely vulnerable from COVID-19

  • Advice to the clinically extremely vulnerable to shield ceases from Thursday 1 April, as virus infection rates continue to fall
  • People on shielded patient list will receive letters from today with updated guidance on steps people can take to reduce their risk
  • More than 9 in 10 clinically extremely vulnerable people have been vaccinated with a first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine

In line with the government’s COVID-19 Response – Spring 2021 roadmap published last month, those on the shielded patient list can begin to follow the national restrictions alongside the rest of the population, but are still advised to take extra precautions to keep themselves safe from COVID-19.

Letters to patients with updated guidance will be arriving from today and over the next 2 weeks. These set out practical steps people can follow to reduce their risk of catching the virus, including continuing to maintain strict social distancing and to keep their overall social contacts at low levels, such as working from home where possible.

The move follows the steady decrease in the number of COVID-19 cases and hospitalisations across the country for the last couple of weeks.

Senior clinicians, including the Deputy Chief Medical Officer for England, Dr Jenny Harries, have recommended that shielding advice is paused nationally from 1 April onwards, as supported by the latest scientific evidence and advice.

With the success of the UK’s COVID-19 vaccination programme, more than 9 in 10 clinically extremely vulnerable people are now vaccinated with their first dose, but it’s still important people continue to follow the national rules and take the additional precautions set out in the guidance to keep themselves as protected as possible.

Local councils and supermarkets will continue to provide support for those shielding until 31 March. If people have already registered for priority access to supermarket delivery slots, they will continue to be able to access these until 21 June 2021.

Deputy Chief Medical Officer for England, Dr Jenny Harries, said:

Shielding has always been an advisory measure to safeguard those who are the most clinically vulnerable in our communities. We recognise how difficult this period has been for so many and the impact it has had on people’s wellbeing.

With the prevalence of the virus in the community continuing to decrease now is the right time for people to start thinking about easing up on these more rigid guidelines.

If you have been shielding, we strongly urge you to take extra precautions following 1 April to keep yourself as safe as possible, such as continuing to observe social distancing and working from home.

We will continue to monitor all of the evidence and adjust this advice should there be any changes in infection rates.

People are still advised to continue working from home where possible, but if people are unable to do so, employers are required by law to take steps to make workplaces COVID-19 secure and should discuss this with their employees.

In February 2021, the government announced a new predictive risk model that helps clinicians identify additional people who may be at higher cumulative risk from COVID-19 due to the combination of their underlying risk factors.

Up to 1.7 million vulnerable individuals were identified by the tool, taking the total number of people in the shielded patient list up to 3.79 million people, as of 6 March 2021. As a result, over 800,000 more adults have been prioritised to receive a vaccine that weren’t already in the top four priority groups for phase one of vaccinations.

The vaccine is likely to make an important contribution towards protecting you from COVID-19. Clinically extremely vulnerable people are expected to receive a vaccination against COVID-19 before the general population. Your local NHS will ensure that you can receive the vaccine as safely as possible, as well as any care and support needed. Even if you have had both doses of the vaccine, you should continue to follow this shielding advice, until further notice as we continue to assess the impact of vaccination among all groups. The people you live with should continue to follow the public health rules and guidance as long as they are in place, including if you have received the vaccine and also if they have received the vaccine.

Useful Links to Support Mental Health

Websites that have useful advice and mental health tips regarding Coronavirus include:

Doctors of the World – advice for patients on Coronavirus in various languages https://www.doctorsoftheworld.org.uk/coronavirus-information/

Mind website https://www.mind.org.uk/information-support/coronavirus-and-your-wellbeing/#collapse620

Anxiety UK https://www.anxietyuk.org.uk/blog/health-and-other-forms-of-anxiety-and-coronavirus/

OCD-UK https://www.ocduk.org/ocd-and-coronavirus-survival-tips/

Every Mind Matters https://www.nhs.uk/oneyou/every-mind-matters

BABCP Covid-19 Anxiety Blog http://letstalkaboutcbt.libsyn.com/coping-with-anxiety-about-coronavirus

Research in Practice has created a useful page full of information on domestic abuse and what options are available to victims during the COVID-19 crisis – https://www.researchinpractice.org.uk/all/news-views/2020/april/domestic-abuse-in-the-coronavirus-epidemic/

Employment and Income During Coronavirus

Information for employees

You can get £94.25 per week Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) if you’re too ill to work. It’s paid by your employer for up to 28 weeks.

If you cannot work while you are self-isolating because of coronavirus (COVID-19), you could get SSP for every day you’re in isolation. You must self-isolate for at least 4 days to be eligible. This includes individuals who are caring for people in the same household and therefore have been advised to do a household quarantine.

If you are not eligible for SSP – for example if you are self-employed or earning below the Lower Earnings Limit of £118 per week – and you have COVID-19 or are advised to self-isolate, you can now more easily make a claim for Universal Credit (UC) or new style Employment and Support Allowance. For more information on how to claim, please visit https://www.gov.uk/universal-credit and https://www.gov.uk/guidance/new-style-employment-and-support-allowance.

Proof of sickness

If you have COVID-19 or are advised to stay at home, you can get an ‘isolation note’ by visiting NHS 111 online, rather than visiting a doctor. For COVID-19 cases this replaces the usual need to provide a ‘fit note’ (sometimes called a ‘sick note’) after 7 days of sickness absence.

Furloughed workers

Find out if you’re eligible and how much you can claim to cover wages for employees on temporary leave (‘furlough’) due to coronavirus (COVID-19) by clicking here.

Universal Credit

If your salary is reduced as a result of these changes, you may be eligible for support through the welfare system, including Universal Credit.

Universal Credit is administered by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) and not Coventry City Council.

Support for rent costs

You should check your eligibility for Universal Credit, which is available for people in and out of work. Support for rental costs will be paid through Universal Credit.

Council Tax Support

Council tax Support is a means tested discount which helps low income households with the cost of Council Tax payments.

If your household is classed as being of working age, then you will need to pay at least 15 per cent of your council tax bill. You may receive help with the remaining 85 per cent depending on your income and the makeup of your household. Pension age households can receive up to 100 per cent support depending on their circumstances.

A 25% discount applies to all single households. Claim Council Tax SupportExemptions apply for people who are severely mentally impaired and live on their own.

You will receive your Council Tax bill in March telling you how much you have to pay. How to pay your Council Tax.

Housing rental payments

Contact your landlord if you’re struggling to pay rent; they may be able to give a rent reduction or accept late payment. Make sure you get something in writing. The Government announced on 18 March that landlords will not be able to apply to court to evict tenants for at least three months. That includes if you rent from a private landlord, a housing association or the council. The new law is expected to come in very soon.

Mortgage payments

Mortgage lenders have announced they won’t apply to court to repossess homeowners for 3 months starting from 19 March. They will also allow a three-month payment holiday for those struggling to cover their mortgage because of coronavirus. Be aware that this option may mean your monthly mortgage payment goes up after the payment holiday ends. Check if you have insurance that will cover your mortgage payments instead. For example, mortgage payment protection insurance or through your current account

Information for self-employed

If you are self-employed and you have COVID-19 or are advised to self-isolate, you can now more easily make a claim for Universal Credit (UC) or new style Employment and Support Allowance. For more information on how to claim, please   visit https://www.gov.uk/universal-credit and https://www.gov.uk/guidance/new-style-employment-and-support-allowance.

If you are self-employed and receiving Universal Credit and you have COVID-19 or are advised to self-isolate, the requirements of the Minimum Income Floor will be temporarily relaxed. This change took effect on 13 March and will last for the duration of the outbreak, to ensure that self-employed UC claimants will receive support.

If you need to claim Universal Credit but have COVID-19 or are self-isolating, you will now be able to claim and to access advance payments upfront without needing to attend a Jobcentre Plus.

If you’re self-employed, Income Tax payments due in July 2020 under the Self-Assessment system can be deferred to January 2021.

Businesses

 All businesses and self-employed people in financial distress, and with outstanding tax liabilities, may be eligible to receive support with their tax affairs through HMRC’s Time To Pay service. These arrangements are agreed on a case-by-case basis and are tailored to individual circumstances and liabilities.

Please follow the link for more information based on the size of your business:   https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/support-for-those-affected-by-covid-19/support-for-those-affected-by-covid-19

Free advice

You can receive free and impartial advice on a range of matters from organisations including:

  • Consumer rights: Free consumer protection advice from the Government on issues including contracts, goods and services
  • Employee rights: Free advice on worker’s rights from the Government
  • Money Advice Service: Free and impartial money advice from an organisation set up by the Government
  • Citizens Advice Service: Free advice on a range of topics including debt, money and finances; law and court and consumer rights
  • Shelter: Free advice on issues such as housing, homelessness, eviction, repairs and repossession

Coventry specific support

Coventry City Council Customer Services  https://www.coventry.gov.uk/

Passionate and dedicated support from housing, benefits, bin collection and recycling, to education, care and safeguarding and many other areas.

Coventry Refugee and Migrant Centre  https://www.covrefugee.org/

Coventry Refugee and Migrant Centre (CRMC) welcomes and empowers asylum seekers, refugees and other migrants in Coventry to rebuild their lives and achieve their potential.

Coventry Family Hubs  https://www.coventry.gov.uk/familyhubs

The family hub model is an approach to the delivery of early help services centralised around a building, where a number of different services providing information and support to families, children and young people are based. They will provide early help and support for families, children and young people aged 0 – 19 years up to age 24 where a young person has a disability.

Coventry Foodbank  https://coventry.foodbank.org.uk/

We don’t think anyone in our community should have to face going hungry. That’s why we provide three days’ nutritionally balanced emergency food and support to local people who are referred to us in crisis. We are part of a nationwide network of foodbanks, supported by The Trussell Trust, working to combat poverty and hunger across the UK.

Coventry Jesus Centre  https://www.coventryjesuscentre.org.uk/

Jesus Centres are places where we provide services to restore dignity and create community. Friendship and help are available for every type of person. The homeless and disadvantaged find a particular welcome at Jesus Centre. They continue to offer ESOL and Conversation Cafes. Please email info@coventryjesuscentre.org.uk for more information.

Central England Law Centre Coventry  https://www.centralenglandlc.org.uk/

We provide free specialist legal advice to those most in need and use legal processes to fight social exclusion.  We advocate for people, challenge unfair decisions, take cases to the highest courts and work in partnerships with other support services.

Coventry Women’s Partnership  http://www.fwt.org.uk/social/coventry-womens-partnership/

This is a city-wide programme that aims to improve economic outcomes for women by providing access to skills, training, confidence building, support into employment and help with overcoming barriers.

Partners:

Foleshill Women’s Training  http://www.fwt.org.uk/

Coventry Haven Women’s Aid  https://www.coventryhaven.co.uk/

CRASAC  http://www.crasac.org.uk/

KairosWWT  https://kairoswwt.org.uk/

Coventry Law Centre   https://www.centralenglandlc.org.uk/

St Francis Assisi Church https://www.stfranciscoventry.org/

We are a lively and busy church based on Links Road – open throughout the week for a wide range of activities and community support including free meals, ESOL classes, work clubs, volunteering and many other interesting workshops.

Carriers of Hope  https://www.carriersofhope.org.uk/

Dedicated to helping Asylum Seekers, Refugees and Eastern European Migrants in the Coventry Area. We can help you with food, furniture items, clothes, baby items, toys, toiletries and other essential items.

Positive Youth Foundation  https://www.positiveyouthfoundation.org/

Supporting young people to achieve their potential in all areas of life.

Positive Youth Foundation is offering an employment hotline for young people aged 15-24! Those who want advice can call 07958 325426 on Monday and Friday.

Share My Language Rhymetime  https://fo-fo.facebook.com/events/coventry-library/share-my-language-rhymetimes/2305193513082041/

A fascinating activity session for children and parents with songs, music, poems and lots of interesting and entertaining educational elements.

Citizens Advice have advice on employment, managing financially and how to access the right support and benefits – https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/health/coronavirus-what-it-means-for-you/

Loan Shark Advice 

What is a ‘Loan Shark’?

A loan shark is a moneylender who charges extremely high rates of interest on people who borrow money from them, typically under illegal conditions.

The England Illegal Money Lending Team (IMLT) recognise that this period may be one of increased financial pressure for some people.

The Team is fully committed to ensuring that illegal money lenders (loan sharks) do not take advantage and profit from other people’s hardship.

The Stop Loan Sharks helping service (0300 555 2222) remains open and fully operational during the COVID-19 pandemic. Officers encourage not only victims but friends, family members and the wider community to come forward if they suspect someone is suffering at the hands of loan sharks.

Education

Some young people may be eligible to receive digital devices and Internet access to support remote learning.

This includes

  • care leavers
  • children and young people aged 0 to 19 with a social worker
  • disadvantaged year 10 pupils

People aged 16 to 19 without a suitable device for education will be eligible for support through the 16 to 19 Bursary Fund. Those offering 16 to 19 education should visit the 16 to 19 Bursary Fund to find out about eligibility for relevant funding and support.

For more information and to apply for digital devices and/or Internet access, please go to https://www.gov.uk/guidance/get-help-with-technology-for-remote-education-during-coronavirus-covid-19#who-is-eligible-to-receive-digital-devices-and-internet-access

Online Learning Resources

Every weekday CRMC is running Kahoot ESOL challenges! To get involved with videos and challenges, request to join the Facebook group that can be found below! https://www.facebook.com/groups/514046279309410/?ref=group_header

St Francis Employability is running quizzes & videos posted to its Facebook page and website! Click the link below to find out more and get involved https://en-gb.facebook.com/stfcov

This Facebook page offers regular maths lessons for FREE whilst schools are closed. They are pitched at KS1, 2 and 3 level. Click the link to discover more https://www.facebook.com/pg/hykmaths/events/?ref=page_internal

Maddie Moate is doing a range of free science videos on YouTube for children! To check them out go to https://www.youtube.com/user/maddiemoate

Younger children may be interested in Share My Language Rhymetime sessions held every Thursday at 11am on Facebook Live (MiFriendly Cities page). This activity session for children and parents includes songs, music, rhymes and lots of interesting and entertaining educational elements – specifically focused on cultural and language exchange. https://fo-fo.facebook.com/events/coventry-library/share-my-language-rhymetimes/2305193513082041/

Follow @covlibraries on Facebook and Twitter for some suggested reading and information on books that available electronically https://www.facebook.com/pg/covlibraries/

Free School Meals

During this time, the Government has extended its Free School Meals provision to some children with families that have no recourse to public funds (NRPF)

The categories that might be eligible are:

  • Children of ‘Zambrano Carers’
  • Children of families granted leave to remain under Article 8 European Convention on Human Rights
  • Children of families are supported under Section 17 Children Act 1989 and that have No Recourse to Public Funds
  • Children of a subset of failed asylum seekers supported under Section 4 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999

Please click here for more advice on eligibility and guidance on how to apply.

Routine Vaccinations 

Vaccination is the most important thing we can do to protect ourselves and our children against ill health. They prevent up to 3 million deaths worldwide every year.

Since vaccines were introduced in the UK, diseases like smallpox, polio and tetanus that used to kill or disable millions of people are either gone or seen very rarely.

Other diseases like measles and diphtheria have been reduced by up to 99.9% since their vaccines were introduced.  However, if people stop having vaccines, infectious diseases may quickly spread again.

Doctors and nurses in Coventry are eager to continue immunisations during the COVID-19 pandemic to protect residents and they want to re-assure people that they have worked hard to keep women and families safe from COVID-19.  Please note that all routine childhood vaccinations are free.

All vaccines are thoroughly tested to make sure they will not harm you or your child.

It often takes many years for a vaccine to make it through the trials and tests it needs to pass for approval.

Speak to your GP practice or your Health Visitor if you’re worried about you or your child having a vaccine.  You can text your Health Visitor on CHAT Health: 07507329114 or through Facebook FB @coventryhealthvisiting

Listen to a Coventry Health Visitor talking about the important of vaccinations her https://youtu.be/FpwiE3kIxcU

Key messages

  • Maintaining your baby’s vaccination schedule is vital to help ensure they are protected against dangerous preventable diseases https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/nhs-vaccinations-and-when-to-have-them/ https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/nhs-vaccinations-and-when-to-have-them/
  • Children must receive their pre-school booster before entering school; it’s never been more important to protect our school communities from preventable diseases
  • The vaccination programme has not stopped; it has continued to be offered by GP practices throughout the COVID19 crisis
  • It is safe to visit your GP surgery for routine vaccinations, they are taking extra precautions to ensure you remain safe. You can always ring and speak to them if you have any concerns
  • It is important to get routine vaccines on time and every time. Don’t wait until a disease outbreak
  • Protect your NHS and get vaccinated
  • Protect your school and community and get vaccinated

More information

For information about why vaccines are important and safe go to https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/why-vaccination-is-safe-and-important/

This webpage allows you to listen to a GP answering frequently asked questions about immunisations

A list of all NHS vaccinations and when to have them can be found here https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/nhs-vaccinations-and-when-to-have-them/

For in depth information about all of the vaccinations available please go to https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/

Pork gelatine can be found in the Mumps, Measles and Rubella (MMR) vaccination but there is another MMR vaccine that you can have that does not have pork gelatine in it, but you must ask your GP for this vaccine before your appointment.  Click here for more information on how and why pork gelatine is used in very few vaccines https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/vaccines-and-porcine-gelatine.  This leaflet is available in English, Urdu, Bengali and Arabic.

A range of information about vaccinations, the importance of vaccinations in a range of languages is available at https://medlineplus.gov/languages/childhoodimmunization.html

The Government has produced a leaflet explaining the importance of the MMR vaccine in Polish, Romanian and Somali which can be found here https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/mmr-for-all-general-leaflet

Tuberculosis vaccine (called the BCG)

In the UK, like many other countries, the BCG is offered to babies who are likely to come into contact with someone with Tuberculosis (TB). This includes babies who live in an area with high rates of TB or babies with parents or grandparents from a country with high rates of TB such as A leaflet about which babies should have the vaccine and why the vaccine is important can be found here in Arabic, Bengali, Farsi, Hindu, Nepali, Pashto, Punjabi, Somali and Urdu. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/tb-bcg-and-your-baby-leaflet

A campaign to raise awareness of the importance of routine childhood vaccinations with Coventry and Warwickshire residents started on the 29th June. This campaign is fully supported by Coventry GPs.

Ramadan 2021

The Muslim Council of Britain – Guidance for #SafeRamadan has been produced for mosque leaders and organisers of taraweehi’itikaf and other Ramadan activities to help in their planning for Ramadan this year to keep our communities as safe as possible.

For latest information on Ramadan please visit this website:

Latest COVID19 Advice for British Muslims

Deliveries

During this time, a lot of delivery companies such as the Royal Mail are limiting the contact they have with customers.

In the case of the Royal Mail, staff are not handing over hand-held devices to customers to get signatures, but will log the name of the person who accepts the delivery. Where an item won’t fit through your letterbox, they will place the item at your door, knock, and then step aside a safe distance while you retrieve your item.

To check the most recent updates from the Royal Mail please click the following link: https://www.royalmail.com/d8/coronavirus-protection

COVID-19 Guidance available in a range of languages

Please promote COVID 19 guidance that is available in a range of languages

 Local support during the pandemic is available at

https://www.coventry.gov.uk/coronavirus

The Community support section includes

  • Emergency Food Hubs 10 Emergency Food Hubs have been created or strengthened across the city. A central hub will coordinate referrals which can be made by an individual online or over the phone and will continue to support the many people already known to need this service locally. Referrals can be made by calling 08085 834 333
  • Operation Shield Support Service To support people who have been strongly advised to stay at home at all times and avoid any face-to-face contact for a period of at least 12 weeks.
  • Support for rough sleepers – During the COVID-19 (coronavirus) emergency, all known rough sleepers and people using night shelters in Coventry had been offered accommodation. This includes those with No Recourse to Public Funds.

Finding community support services A map of support services has been developed please click the buttons at the top to filter what type of support you are looking for or click the buttons down the side to see what is available in your ward. Below the map you will then see information including the name and contact details of each individual group

If you need help in finding the right support, our contact number is 08085 834333.

 Other Useful Links 

“IOM UK has designed a Covid-19 Migrant Information Service to provide extra support to migrants in the challenging context of the Covid-19 crisis.

The info service includes:

  • a multilingual website www.covid19uk.iom.int
  • a telephone service 0800 464 3380.
  • to provide information to migrants living in the UK on 5 key topics: health, work, benefits, visas and immigration, housing and homelessness.

The website also provides a comprehensive overview of the various governmental and non-governmental support schemes that are available to migrants. Finally, it provides signposted information for users to get further information and/or begin the process of accessing support. The website is currently available in many languages: English, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Arabic, Chinese, Albanian and Vietnamese, with Polish to be added soon. The telephone service provides information to callers in any language, and is available on Freephone 0800 464 3380.”

Local GPs and Accident and Emergency departments are still open. To find out what you should and shouldn’t click here.

Irish Health Service has provided a 16-page information booklet and posters about COVID-19 in different languages – https://www.hse.ie/eng/services/news/newsfeatures/covid19-updates/partner-resources/covid-19-translated-resources/

Doctors of the World – advice for patients on Coronavirus in various languages https://www.doctorsoftheworld.org.uk/coronavirus-information/

The Traveller Movement have collated a series of resources and fact sheets specifically aimed at supporting Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities at this time. https://www.travellermovement.org.uk/index.php/covid-19

Joe Wicks is doing PE lessons live online every weekday at 9am. This will help people of all ages stay active and entertained https://www.facebook.com/JoeWicksTheBodyCoach/

Research in Practice has created a useful page full of information on domestic abuse and what options are available to victims during the COVID-19 crisis – https://www.researchinpractice.org.uk/all/news-views/2020/april/domestic-abuse-in-the-coronavirus-epidemic/

Every weekday CRMC is running Kahoot ESOL challenges! To get involved with videos and challenges, request to join the Facebook group that can be found below! https://www.facebook.com/groups/514046279309410/?ref=group_header

St Francis Employability is running quizzes & videos posted to its Facebook page and website! Click the link below to find out more and get involved https://en-gb.facebook.com/stfcov

Social Innovation Emerald Book Club is holding daily online stretching between 10:30-11am. To get involved, please contact them on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/EmeraldBookClub/

Positive Youth Foundation is offering an employment hotline for young people aged 15-24! Those who want advice can call 07958 325426 on Monday and Friday.

Younger children may be interested in Share My Language Rhymetime sessions held every Thursday at 11am on Facebook Live (MiFriendly Cities page). This activity session for children and parents includes songs, music, rhymes and lots of interesting and entertaining educational elements – specifically focused on cultural and language exchange. https://fo-fo.facebook.com/events/coventry-library/share-my-language-rhymetimes/2305193513082041/

Follow @covlibraries on Facebook and Twitter for some suggested reading to keep you busy during the COVID-19 crisis https://www.facebook.com/pg/covlibraries/

Sadhguru is providing daily meditation at 12:30pm on YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQ9xr7dmcpY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Section Icon Self-care

There are a lot of things that you can do to look after your own health and prevent yourself from becoming unwell. Many illnesses or symptoms can be treated at home with the help of a well-stocked medicine cabinet and plenty of rest.


Section Icon NHS Choices and NHS 111

If you’re not sure what kind of care you need, you’ll find lots of useful information and a free symptom checker online at NHS.uk. You can also ring 111, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for free confidential advice and information.


Section Icon Pharmacies

Your local pharmacist / chemist will be happy to advise you on common illnesses and the medicines you need to treat them.


Section Icon GPs

Your own GP is the best person to speak to about persistent health problems and illnesses that won’t go away.

Your GP will make sure you are up to date with your immunisations and will also ensure you are invited to be screened for a number of conditions, depending on your age and gender.


Section Icon Out-of-hours / GP Service

When your own GP surgery is closed, you can access the out-of-hours service. The 111 service will be able to help you if you need to see a GP urgently in the evening or at a weekend


Section Icon Emergency dental care

We do recommend that you find a regular dentist, and you can find one through NHS 111.  If you do not have a regular dentist and need emergency care you should contact 111.


Section Icon Emergency Department or 999

Emergency Department and 999 services provide emergency care for people who have symptoms of serious illness or are badly injured.